James Monroe joe

Era of Good Feeling (NCF)- was the name applied to the period in the United States corresponding with the term of President James Monroe, from 1817 to 1825. The phrase is believed to have been coined by a Boston newspaper shortly after Monroe took office.

American System (NCF)- the policy of promoting industry in the U.S. by adoption of a high protective tariff and of developing internal improvements by the federal government (as advocated by Henry Clay from 1816 to 1828)

Henry Clay- an American lawyer and planter, statesman, and skilled orator who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and House of Representatives. He served three non-consecutive terms as Speaker of the House of Representatives and served as Secretary of State under President John Quincy Adams from 1825 to 1829.

Protective Tariffs- A duty imposed on imports to raise their price, making them less attractive to consumers and thus protecting domestic industries from foreign competition.

Internal Improvements- the term used historically in the United States for public works from the end of the American Revolution through much of the 19th century, mainly for the creation of a transportation infrastructure: roads, turnpikes, canals, harbors and navigation improvements.

National Highway- a network of highways that is managed and maintained by agencies of the Government of India. These highways measured over 100,087 km (62,191 mi) as of June 2016, including over 1,000 km (620 mi) of limited-access expressways (motorways).

Erie Canal- a canal in New York that is part of the east–west, cross-state route of the New York State Canal System (formerly known as the New York State Barge Canal). Originally, it ran about 363 miles (584 km) from Albany, on the Hudson River, to Buffalo, at Lake Erie.

Rush-Bagot Treaty- was a treaty between the United States and the United Kingdom limiting naval armaments on the Great Lakes and Lake Champlain, following the War of 1812. It was ratified by the United States Senate on April 16, 1818,[1] and was confirmed by Canada, following Confederation, in 1867. The treaty provided for a large demilitarization of lakes along the international boundary, where many British naval arrangements and forts remained.

Seminole War- also known as the Florida Wars, were three conflicts in Florida between the Seminole—the collective name given to the amalgamation of various groups of Native Americans and African Americans who settled in Florida in the early 18th century—and the United States Army.

Adams-Onis Treaty (NCF)- a treaty between the United States and Spain in 1819 that ceded Florida to the U.S. and defined the boundary between the U.S. and New Spain. It settled a standing border dispute between the two countries and was considered a triumph of American diplomacy. It came in the midst of increasing tensions related to Spain's territorial boundaries in North America against the United States and Great Britain in the aftermath of the American Revolution; and also during the Latin American Wars of Independence.

Convention of 1818- was an international treaty signed in 1818 between those parties. Signed during the presidency of James Monroe, it resolved standing boundary issues between the two nations. The treaty allowed for joint occupation and settlement of the Oregon Country, known to the British and in Canadian history as the Columbia District of the Hudson's Bay Company, and including the southern portion of its sister district New Caledonia.

Panic of 1819- was the first major peacetime financial crisis in the United States followed by a general collapse of the American economy persisting through 1821.

Land Act of 1820- the United States federal law that ended the ability to purchase the United States' public domain lands on a credit or installment system over four years, as previously established.

Missouri Compromise (NCF)- A settlement of a dispute between slave and free states, contained in several laws passed during 1820 and 1821. Northern legislators had tried to prohibit slavery in Missouri, which was then applying for statehood.

Santa Fe Trail- was a 19th-century transportation route through central North America that connected Independence, Missouri with Santa Fe, New Mexico. Pioneered in 1821 by William Becknell, it served as a vital commercial highway until the introduction of the railroad to Santa Fe in 1880.

Monroe Doctrine (NCF)- a principle of US policy, originated by President James Monroe in 1823, that any intervention by external powers in the politics of the Americas is a potentially hostile act against the US.

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