Blake's View of God and Human Nature By: Patrick Imbornoni

William Blake was the author of the two poems "The Lamb" and "The Tyger" which contain an abundant amount of religious references. In these two poems Blake creates an image of a creator, God, by explaining what the creator had created.

In the Lamb, Blake asks the Lamb on multiple occasions if They knew who their creator was. The persona tells the lamb that it is the same creator who created their voice and clothes. Blake is pointing out that God, the creator, made many things and basicly everything. Blake describes to the Lamb that their creator was also called a lamb. The creator is also described as being meek and mild. The Persona also tells the Lamb that the creator became a small child. Blake tells us that God is the creator of things and he is symbolized as a lamb and also a child.

In poem "The Lamb", the reader learns about human nature. Blake, the poet, writes "I a child am thou a lamb, We are calléd by his name." These two lines are meant to tell the reader that humans are made like God because they like God are like a lamb and a child. God created humans to be like him. The next line tells the reader we are asked to be like him and continue in his ways. Blake says that the nature of man is that like God.

Blake also shares his view about God and the nature of man in the poem "The Tyger". Blake creates the idea of a God being immortal with the fact that the tiger has been created and designed fearfully. He also asks the question how does one make a tiger, from what, and where would one person who does come from. This is portraying the creator, God, as mystical and almost magical in his work. Blake also says that God is really powerful and that his power is fearful. The persona is also asked the question of did the creator of this beast, tiger, also create the peaceful thing, lamb.

In the poem "The Tiger" we learn about man and his nature with the use of good and evil. The poem is basicly asking how was the devil made, with the devil being a tiger. It really asks the question of who created evil and why. Blake made it seem like God created evil for humans to overcome and deal with.

Credits:

Created with images by MrsBrown - "animal mammal farm" • Alexas_Fotos - "tiger predator fur"

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