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In the Artist's Studio with Marg Smith

This is the second time Marg Smith has been the subject of my blog "In the Artist's Studio" and truthfully not that much has changed except for the colour of our hair. Marg is still a passionate artist creating beautiful works of art - she is still teaching and learning - she still creates in the same lovely well lit and spacious studio in her home - she still sells her work in a number of galleries throughout the province and she is still evolving as an artist.

Check back on my blog of February 2016 for the first one. https://www.cjbenningtonphotography.ca/blog/2016/2

Marg is always welcoming of visitors to her creative space. Unfortunately, due to Covid she is not able to teach group classes at present, she does, however, still teach one on one. There's plenty of space to keep your distance in her studio/gallery which contains some distinct spaces. Like this one here - her main painting easel where she is working on a commission piece that will in all likelihood become a family heirloom. Marg keeps her computer monitor and photographs as references close at hand.

Marg Smith is one of the few artists I know who enjoy a commission. Many feel the pressure of meeting someone else's expectations in addition to their own but she is invigorated by the challenge it presents.

The Smith's home has a welcoming yard for feathered friends and since there is a constant supply of seed available so are the opportunities for photo shoots for reference material.

Marg loves colour - tubes of vibrant colour

Her brushes neatly lined up and ready for paint.

Cast-offs from classes that required a particular colour no longer needed as she prefers to mix her own.

I find most artist's have some unique little something they have either found or created that serves a very specific purpose and has become irreplaceable in their process. For Marg I think that piece may be her solvent holder. Indispensable for the "en plein aire" and studio artist alike.

There seems to be a bit of colour from very piece Marg has created on this container - each splash, scratch and smudge adding to it's character.

The "drying area" where the latest topic of Marg's painting interest soaks up some rays. Grain Elevators, giants of the prairies were once a landmark in every town are disappearing at an alarming rate but, thanks to artists like Marg, they will live on.

a quick lesson on how she drafts out a new piece - this one will become a chickadee.

Through a process of collection and her version of settling ponds Marg recycles her solvent but still goes through a couple of gallons of the stuff per year. The Ragu bottle holds about 5 years worth of paint solids - I estimate it has approximately 6 - 8 months of space available.

Off to the "gallery space"

An explanation of changes she made to a piece I recognized. Some teachers insist on "their way" but when that way doesn't work for the student she can take the piece home and make some much needed alterations. One of the benefits of painting in oil.

I was happy to have the opportunity to photograph some of Marg's larger pieces. It's always difficult for an artist to decide what to hang in a gallery where wall space is a precious commodity so we often opt for more smaller pieces and the larger, more expensive pieces don't get the same opportunity to find their forever homes.

I'll finish my visit to Lavender Art Studio with another subject Marg enjoys painting - llamas. I think this one should be named "Attitude" that or "Pucker Up Baby" - what do you think?

You can enjoy more of Marg's art by visiting her website at www.margsmithfineart.com, by following her Facebook page @margsmithfineart, or her Instagram posts @mistyque2012

Marg's art is also viewable in person at Highwood Gallery & Gifts in High River, AB or on their website at www.highwoodgalleryandgifts.com If you're lucky in your timing you may get to meet the artist as she is one of the artists who work shifts at the gallery.

Until next time - Stay Safe and Stay Healthy!

Created By
Cathy Bennington
Appreciate

Credits:

C.J. Bennington Fine Art Photography