Marriage in Elizabethan England ALyssa Hughes

You first start with a betrothal. You both agree on it and it is a formal ceremony. You would get married a month or two. The only way it could be broken by mutual agreement (Forgeng 50,51).

<img src="http://quest.eb.com/images/108/108_4069/108_4069470-W.jpg" alt="Procession for the wedding of Frederick V, Elector Palatine..."/>

You had to announce your wedding at the event before so if there were any impediments also to see if you are family. (Weatherly 66) Many people would show up to the wedding. There are some customs that you have to do. First you have to agree to each other, then at your wedding you have a notary to record the wedding, next the bride would be handed off by her father. Last there is rings, a kiss, and holding hands. After the ceremony there would be dancing, singing, music, and food (Grendler 51,52).

Royal Wedding. Photographer. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/115_892338/1/115_892338/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

Wedding rings were important because it symbolizes that you are married and that you are connected to someone for infinity (Forgeng 50,51).

Two identical gold rings. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/118_806834/1/118_806834/cite. Accessed 8 Mar 2017.
  • Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance. Vol. 4. New York: Scribner, 1999. Print.
  • Forgeng, Jeffrey L. Daily Life in Elizabethan England. Westport, CT: Greenwood, 1995. Print.
  • Weatherly, Myra. Living in Elizabethan England. San Diego: Greenhaven, 2004. Print.
  • Two identical gold rings. Photograph. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/118_806834/1/118_806834/cite. Accessed 8 Mar 2017.
  • Elizabethan Wedding Presentation - Pre-ap English 09 Ninthgradeworks909. Dir. Brooke Wilson and Paige Eacret. Youtube. Ninthgradeworks909, 2012. Web. 15 Mar. 2017.
  • Procession for the wedding of Frederick V, Elector Palatine and Princess Elizabeth, c.1613 (engraving) . engraving. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.
  • quest.eb.com/search/108_4069470/1/108_4069470/cite. Accessed 16 Mar 2017.

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