The Microscope's History By Richard Zhang

Robert Hooke

Birth and death dates:

Born 25 January 1627, Died 31 December 1691 (aged 64)

Place of birth:

Isle of Wight

Occupations :

Polymath, Architect, Physicist, Philosopher

Contribution to the development of the microscope:

He is best known for his law of elasticity (Hooke's law), his book Micrographia, published in 1665 and for first applying the word "cell" to describe the basic unit of life.

Interesting “juicy” facts:

Hooke worked with Boyle for seven years from 1655 to 1662. Hooke and Boyle made improvements in Otto von Guericke’s air pump leading to the creation of their famous “Machina Boyleana” or “Pneumatical Engine” in 1659.

Picture of his Microscope
Zacharias Janssen

Birth and death dates:

Born in 1585 (1580) and died in before 1632 (sometimes 1638)

Place of birth:

The Hague

Occupation:

spectacle-maker

Contribution to the development of the microscope:

Johannes claims include that his father invented the telescope in 1590, that his father invented the telescope in 1604, that he and his father invented the telescope in 1618, and that Jacob Metius and Cornelis Drebbel bought a telescope from him and his father in 1620 and copied it.

Interesting “juicy” facts:

Janssen's life was documented by the many investigations on the subject before the Second World War. Many of the Middelburg archives were destroyed by a bombing of Middelburg on May 17, 1940, during the Nazi invasion of the Netherlands.

Reproduction of an optical device
Anton van Leeuwenhoek

Birth and death dates:

Born 24 October 1632 and died 26 August 1723 (aged 90)

Place of birth:

Delft, Dutch Republic

Occupation:

Microscopist, biologist

Contribution to the development of the microscope:

By placing the middle of a small rod of soda lime glass in a hot flame, Van Leeuwenhoek could pull the hot section apart to create two long whiskers of glass. Then, by reinserting the end of one whisker into the flame, he could create a very small, high-quality glass sphere. These spheres became the lenses of his microscopes, with the smallest spheres providing the highest magnifications.

interesting “juicy” facts :

When he was young, Leeuwenhoek’s job was as a draper. In 1654, he established his first shop. During his childhood time, he was raised by his family in Delft, Netherlands.

A replica of his Microscope

References :

8 Facts about Anton van Leeuwenhoek. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2017, from http://factfile.org/8-facts-about-anton-van-leeuwenhoek

(n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2017, from https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonie_van_Leeuwenhoek#/media/File%3ALeeuwenhoek_Microscope.png

Microscopes - Binoculars & Scopes: Electronics: Stereo Microscopes, Compound Microscopes & More. (n.d.). Retrieved January 12, 2017, from https://www.amazon.com/Microscopes/b?ie=UTF8&node=499170

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.