The "Eggsperience" Andrew Wozniak

Grade: 8th

Teacher: Kotarski

St. Barnabas School

Move: 8

Purpose

The purpose of this experiment was to understand the ideas of acceleration, force, and gravity. I became interested in this experiment when I saw a Youtuber dropping IPhones from the top of a building and seeing what kept the phones safe and what didn’t. The information gained from this experiment will help others by giving them an idea of the physics behind the egg dropping.

Research Article

The title of the article that I researched is Background Information on Egg Drop Experiments by Joel. The article talks about the laws about Isaac Newton's three laws of motion, force, mass, and acceleration, equal and opposite forces, and conservation of energy. Newton’s first law says the forces on an egg will make the egg stay in motion until it hits the ground making the forces equal so that it stays at rest. The second says that the heavier the egg and its protective method the faster it will move. The third laws shows that if the materials used to protect the egg exert an equal force the egg won’t break. This article connects to my experiment because it explains how the laws of motion apply to my egg drop.

Question

What protective methods will cause the egg not to break?

Hypothesis

My hypotheses are that if the egg is surrounded by a soft material that is then covered in a hard shell, then the egg will not break and if the contraption is heavier, then it will travel faster. I base my hypothesis on Newton’s three laws and the fact that this method will absorb the force of the ground.

Materials

  • 10 Eggs
  • A box of straws
  • A roll of masking tape
  • Plastic bag
  • A roll of string
  • 8 soft sponges
  • One plastic rectangular tupperware container
  • Two large ziploc bags
  • Bubble Wrap
  • Tape Measure
  • Data table and pencil

Procedure

  1. Create two hexagon shapes by taping the straws together.
  2. Cut more straws into quarters and create a box shape that will hold the egg.
  3. Connect the two hexagons to the top and bottom of the box with the remaining straws.
  4. Place the egg into the open end of the box.
  5. Take the plastic bag and tie a piece of string to each handle on the bag.
  6. Tie the strings to an egg and secure the string with tape.
  7. Fill the two ziploc bags halfway full and place eggs inside.
  8. Place sponges on the bottom and along the sides of the rectangular container.
  9. Put the egg in and tape the cover on so that the egg doesn’t fall out.
  10. Wrap two eggs separately in bubble wrap and tape it so that it stays on.
  11. Create a data table and record whether or not you think that the egg will break.
  12. Drop each of the eggs with their protective cases from 5 ft off of the ground.
  13. Repeat step 12 at 10 ft off of the ground.
  14. Record in the data table whether or not the egg broke and how long it took the egg to reach the ground.

Results

Data Tables

Data Table #1
Data table #2

Graph

Before the experiment photos

After the experiment photos

Conclusion

My hypotheses were if the egg is surrounded by a soft material that is then covered in a hard shell, then the egg will not break and if the contraption is heavier, then it will travel faster. I base my hypothesis on Newton’s three laws and the fact that this method will absorb the force of the ground. The results indicate that both of my hypotheses should be considered true because the hard tupperware filled with soft sponges caused the egg to stay in tact and the heavier the method the faster it traveled. Because of the results of this experiment, I wonder if I used other fragile objects, such as glass Christmas ornaments or cell phones, if they would also be protected. If I were to conduct this science fair experiment again I would drop the containers on different sides and at different angle or from higher distances above the ground. Another I would trying dropping hard boiled eggs.

Created By
Andrew Wozniak
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