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National Cereal Day Kilbourne students voice their opinions about their favorite cereals

Each year National Cereal Day is celebrated on March 7th. Cereal has been a long time breakfast favorite across America, and it is estimated that around 43% of Americans eat cereal each day. Cereal was originally invented as an alternative to the previously popular meat heavy breakfasts, and popularized during the push towards healthier diets that occurred around the time of the industrial revolution. It was largely encouraged by Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, who hoped to eliminate fatty and greasy foods from people diets, and eventually went on to invent corn flakes. While most of today's cereals are far more sugary, cereal has stood the test of time and evolved to offer a wide range of brands and varieties. Recently, Kilbourne students voiced their opinions about cereal and shared their favorites.

Gwen Hatcher (left): Cinnamon Toast Crunch; Drew Spampinatio (right): Chocolate Lucky Charms
Zach Santaguida (left): Fiber One; Cassidy Oyer (middle): Fruity Pebbles; Dylan Shoemaker (right): Honey Bunches of Oats
Emily Mosic (left): Lucky Charms; Luke Compton (right): Honey Nut Cheerios

Student were also asked to add their input on a common cereal controversy: should the cereal or the milk be poured in the bowl first? Almost all of them agreed that the cereal should always be added to the bowl first, however one said that cereal is best with no milk at all. However all the students interviewed agreed that the milk should never be poured in first.

Despite the many disagreements and variations surrounding the best kinds of cereal, and the ways in which it should be eaten, it will likely continue to be a favorite for many years to come. It offers both convenience and versatility along with its wide variety to many Americans, making it the perfect choice for breakfast, or any other time of the day. So this year on March 7th, don't forget to eat a bowl of your favorite cereal, and thank Dr. John Harvey Kellogg for his contributions to the development of cereal. 

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Created with an image by Unknown - "Cereal | Free Stock Photo | Close-up of round breakfast ..."