STEM for Girls Tracey Kirchman, GPISD & Sylvia Locklear, DPISD

"If more students, at all levels, can have rewarding experiences exploring engineering, many more are likely to become interested and want to pursue it."

(Bystydzienski, Eisenhart, & Bruning, 2015)

PD Objectives

Content

I can explore web links to draw conclusions about girls in STEM.

Language

I can participate in a STEM lesson collaboratively.

Girls in STEM

“Today, more girls and women are using technology than ever before. But relatively few are playing a role in creating technology or pursuing studies in STEM. In middle school, 74% of girls express interest in STEM, but when choosing a college major, just 0.4% of high school girls select computer science. While 57% of bachelor's degrees are earned by women, just 12% of computer science degrees are awarded to women."

(Solomon, 2015)

Scan the QR or type the address to come to this page and explore the following links.

https://goo.gl/Njku

Empowering our girls into STEM careers

Teachers, please take a look at the following links.

34 American Lady Scientist

Low Math Confidence Discourages Females from STEM

Explore Careers

Engineer Girl

National Center for Women & Technology

She-Geeks Infographic

Engineering for High School Girls

Teachers after reviewing the links, is there something that stood out? Is there something that you liked? Is there anything that surprised you?

Engaging Girls in STEM

"The best ways to encourage girls toward STEM education are through immersion, engagement, modeling, and mapping; Immersing girls in a work environment with real utility employees; engaging them with hands-on activities; allowing them to hear directly from female employees about their career paths...are all critical to captivating girls' attention and interest."

(Graham, 2015)

Find STEM lessons here

Take a look at these resources.

GirlStart (Our lesson for today comes from this site)

Texas Girls Collaborative Project

SciGirls Connect (Spanish lessons available as well)

Howtosmile (catalog of STEM activities)

PBS Kids DesignSquad

Community Event

The Houston Museum of Natural Science hosts an annual Girl Exploring Math and Science (GEMS)

When: Saturday, February 17, 2018

GEMS

Let's practice STEM together!

Objectives

Content

I can graphically represent using a dot plot whether a sample plastic material will sink or float.

I can compare and contrast physical properties of sample plastic material and their ability to sink or float.

Language

I can create a device that will safely remove plastic from the ocean without harming wildlife.

I can explain my prototype and share how it works.

I can promote my prototype by creating a flyer using Adobe Spark Post in order to get funding for our device.

TEKS

Science

4.5.a Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:

(A) measure, compare, and contrast physical properties of matter, including size, mass, volume, states (solid, liquid, gas), temperature, magnetism, and the ability to sink or float;

5.5.a Matter and energy. The student knows that matter has measurable physical properties and those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used. The student is expected to:

(A) classify matter based on physical properties, including mass, magnetism, physical state (solid, liquid, and gas), relative density (sinking and floating), solubility in water, and the ability to conduct or insulate thermal energy or electric energy;

Technology

126.7.4 c evaluate student created products through self and peer review for relevance to the assignment or task.

Engineering

ETS1.A: Possible solutions to a problem are limited by available materials and resources (constraints). The success of a designed solution is determined by considering the desire features of a solution (criteria). Different proposals for solutions can be compared on the basis of how well each one meets the specified criteria for success or how well each takes the constraints into account.

Mathematics

4.9.a Data analysis. The student applies mathematical process standards to solve problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting data. The student is expected to:

(A) represent data on a frequency table, dot plots, or stem-and-leaf plots marked with whole numbers and fractions;

6.12.a Measurement and data. The student applies mathematical process standards to use numerical or graphical representations to analyze problems. The student is expected to:

(A) represent numeric data graphically, including dot plots, stem-and-leaf plots, histograms, and box plots;

Career: Marine Engineer

Design and oversee construction and repair of marine craft and floating structures such as ships, barges, tugs, submarines, torpedoes, floats, and buoys.

Vocabulary:

opaque: not able to be seen through

translucent: allows some light, but not detailed images to pass through

transparent: allows light to pass through so that objects behind can be distinctly seen

gyre: massive, slow-rotating whirlpools in which plastic trash accumulates in our oceans created by the circulating large systems of water currents in the oceans couple with wind and the earth's rotation

Turn and talk with an elbow buddy. Name things made of plastic and discuss uses of plastics in our daily lives and plastic disposal.

Explore properties of plastics by working with your group to fill in the investigation sheet using the samples provided.

Student and teacher discuss video.

Work with your group to create a device to collect plastics from the ocean with minimal damage to the environment.
When your group is finished, go to Adobe Spark Post and create a flyer to receive funding by taking a picture of your device. Be prepared to present your device and how it functions to your classmates.

Discuss immediate solutions to plastic pollutions and review objectives to end lesson.

PD Objectives

Content

I can explore web links to draw conclusions about girls in STEM.

Language

I can participate in a STEM lesson collaboratively.

References

Bystydzienski, J. M., Eisenhart, M., & Bruning, M. (2015). High School Is Not Too Late: Developing Girls' Interest and Engagement in Engineering Careers. Career Development Quarterly, 63(1), 88-95. doi:10.1002/j.2161-0045.2015.00097.x

Graham, T. H. (2015). Girl Power. Electric Perspectives, 40(3), 21.

Solomon, G. (2015, October). Hours of code: past & present. Technology & Learning, 36(3), 28+. Retrieved from https://libproxy.uhcl.edu/login?url=http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/A431533144/BIC1?u=txshracd2589&xid=f78fb4ef

STEM Lesson was found at http://www.girlstart.org/

Credits:

Created with images by CERDEC - "Engaging Girls in STEM Event" • COD Newsroom - "College of DuPage Society of Women Engineers Host Girl Scouts 2015 37" • Idaho National Laboratory - "K-12 STEM Education" • USACE HQ - "1600317-A-AY453-025" • edenpictures - "Robot Girl" • woodleywonderworks - "first drop of water is the best drop of water" • COD Newsroom - "College of DuPage Society of Women Engineers Host Girl Scouts 2015 24" • hillarydaniels - "untitled image" • Forbenius - "Even if your objectives are sometime foggy, you get good friends on the way #goldengate #sanfrancisco #fog #goodfriends #weeklypic #ig_color" • Kanenori - "landscape indonesia halmahera" • werner22brigitte - "flying seagull bird" • recyclind - "plastic garbage collection" • werner22brigitte - "humpback whale natural spectacle nature" • Franklin Park Library - "2015 Outreach" • Muffet - "references"

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