Anne Frank Portfolio Emily Arrieta - Period 3

Anne Frank Biography

Exploring Anne Frank's Amsterdam

The secret annex

During the time of World War 2 the Nazi's were capturing Jews and the Frank Family went into hiding. Anne Frank and her family lived in the Annex in secret. The Annex was a secret room in the back of her father's spice shop. Anne called it the Secret Annex in her diary because no one knew about and they had to keep quiet.

This is the bookshelf in the Frank Family's house that opened up into The Secret Annex.
This is the Frank Family home in Amsterdam.

Vondelpark

Vondelpark was opened in 1865 and named after the poet Joost van den Vondelpark. The park includes an open air theater, a playground, and several horeca facilities and is a total of 120 acres. Constructed on a muddy dump area, the Vondelpark has to go through the total renovation each 30 years because it was made on a muddy dump area. Vondelpark attracts about 10 million visitors annually.

This is the sign of entering Vondelpark.
This is a gazebo in Vondelpark and was made for musicians to play their instruments.

Nuremberg law

This is a picture of the chart that Hitler put all over Germany to tell if people were Had German blood or not.
  1. Marriage between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood are forbidden. Marriages nevertheless concluded are invalid, even if concluded abroad to circumvent the law. Annulment proceedings can be initiated only by the State Prosecutor.
  2. Extramarital intercourse between Jews and subjects of the state of German or related blood is forbidden.
  3. Jews may not employ in their household female subjects of the state of German or related blood who are under 45 years old.
  4. Jews are forbidden to fly the Reich or National flag or to display the Reich colors. They are, on the other hand, permitted to display the Jewish colors. The exercise of this right is protected by the State.
  5. Any person who violates the prohibition under I will be punished by a prison sentence with hard labor. A male who violates the prohibition under I will be punished with a prison sentence with or without hard labor. Any person violating the provisions under III or IV will be punished with a prison sentence of up to one year and a fine, or with one or the other of these penalties. The Reich Minister of the Interior, in coordination with the Deputy of the F├╝hrer and the Reich Minister of Justice, will issue the Legal and Administrative regulations required to implement and complete the Law. The Law takes effect on the day following promulgations except for III, which goes into force on January 1, 1936. Nuremberg, September 15, 1935 at the Reich Party Congress of Freedom.
The Nuremberg laws were laws that were meant to exclude Jews from the German way of life. The laws took away Jews natural rights and freedom. According to the laws, Jewish people could no longer marry who they wanted, vote, or be proud of their country. The Nuremberg laws disgraced Jews and especially Germany for their lack of partaking in the equality of humanity. The laws were cruel to the Jewish people and gave them no independence and no way of being an equal, like they were.

Propaganda

Propaganda is a way to advertise a certain idea or opinion. It is used to persuade people to change there perspective on what is being advertised. There are eight ways to persuade someone using propaganda. They are demonization, half -truths or lies, name calling, visual symbols, emotional appeals, catchy slogans, patriotic appeals, and humors or caricatures. Demonization is used to portray the enemy as evil, name calling is using negative connotation words to bring hatred towards the enemy. The emotional appealing technique plays with the person's emotions to promote. The strongest emotion is usually fear, so it is used often in propaganda. There are numerous methods of propaganda, many of which were commonly used in World War II.

Characters

Otto Frank

Otto Frank was born in Frankfurt, Germany on May 12, 1889. He was a former soldier in the military, and it served him well in the Annex. Otto was the leader and was looked towards for help and guidance. Otto was the only person in his family to survive the concentration camps. He later died in 1980, after pubslishing Anne's Diary.

Peter van Pels

Peter van Pels was a Jewish boy who was born in 1926, in Germany. Peter was yet another Jew who went into hiding with the Frank Family. He and Anne gain a friendship in the Annex, but Peter was sent to Auschwitz when they were caught, and transferred to Mauthausen where he died from illness. Peter died in 1945 when he was still a teenage boy ready to live his life.

Edith Frank

Edith Frank was born in Germany to the name of Edith Hollander. In 1925 Edith married Otto Frank and became what she is known as today. Edith is the mother of Margot and Anne. She was a women who didn't have a job and stayed at home to care for it. Edith was sent to Auschwitz and dies of illness a year after her arrival.

Bep Voskuijl

Bep Voskuijl was born in Amsterdam. She received a job at Otto Frank's company as a typist. Bep was told about the plans for the Frank family to go into hiding. She was one of few people who knew and helped the Frank's. Supplying food, clothes, and books, Bep kept the family in hiding. After World War 2 was over, Bep testified the authenticity of Anne's diary in 1954. Bep Voskuijl was 63 years of age when she died in 1983.

Anne Frank Act 1 Summary

At the beginning of act 1, Mr. Frank comes back to the Annex after surviving the Holocast and realizes his family is dead and is given Anne's diary. Next we meet the characters who are going to live in the Annex throughout the 2yrs. In the Frank family there was Otto (father), Edith (mother), Margot (sister) and of course Anne. Accompanying them were Mr. and Mrs. Vandaan with their son Peter. They all go to the Annex and set everything up and go over the rules. After awhile Mr. Kraler, a dentist, joins them in hiding and his attitude is disliked by everyone in the Annex. Anne starts growing up in hiding, she wakes up one night from a nightmare and screams. Everyone is upset, this is her turning point to try and be nicer and make things work with her mom. Hanukkah comes around and Anne gives everyone a gift even thought they have little. They hear a noise downstairs and instantly they get scared thinking it was the green police or a thief who is going to tell people that they are hiding there.

Warsaw Ghetto Uprising

The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising took place from 1939 to 1945, which was were Jewish residents revolted against deportations to extermination camps. The uprising resulted in many deaths estimated to be about 300,000 killed by bullet wounds or gas, but in addition to the uprising there were about 92,000 victims of hunger or starvation and diseases that were caused by hunger. The Germans also suffered from 300 casulites which was significantly less then the Jews casualties, which as in the thousands. Even though the Jews lost many lives that day it encouraged more revolts and future uprisings. It strengthened the bond between Jews and made them morally stronger and united as one. It made them believe and feel that they had a say in the matter at hand.

Anne Frank act 2 Summary

When act 2 began, it was a new year and everyone was already on the verge of loosing their hope of ever being free. The members in the attic received news that Mr. Kraler believes someone is trying to blackmail them and came to ask Mr. Frank for advice. Peter and Anne are beginning to tolerate one another. They spent most of their time talking to each other and sharing their thoughts. Peter kisses Anne on the cheek and that's when there relationship starts to stir. Mr. Vandaan gets fought sneaking food and this sends Mrs. Frank in a fury and wants him and his family kicked out except for Peter. The climax hits and they hear someone downstairs and soon get frightened. Months later the families get taken away by the Nazis and are not heard of again.

Created By
Emily Arrieta
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Created with images by #adamtasimages - "One way track"

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