Figurative Language Describing The types of figurative Language

Alliteration

The repetition of beginning consonant sounds.

An illustration of Alliteration
Alice’s aunt ate apples and acorns around August.

Allusion

MAKES MAKES A REFERENCE TO A PLACE, PERSON, OR SOME METHING THAT HAPPENED.

An illustration of Allusion
When she lost her job, she acted like a Scrooge, and refused to buy anything that wasn’t necessary.” Scrooge was an extremely stingy character from Charles Dickens’, A Christmas Carol.

Hyperbole

Exaggerated statements or claims not meant to be taken literally.

An illustration of Hyperbole
It was so cold I saw polar bears wearing jackets.

Idiom

word or phrase that is not taken literally.

An illustration of an Idiom
Jump the gun - would mean to be doing something

Metaphor

a figure of speech containing an implied comparison, in which a word or phrase ordinarily and primarily used of one thing is applied to another.

Illustration of a Metaphor
Rollercoaster of emotions - A rollercoaster of emotions doesn't exist anywhere, so when people are on a rollercoaster of emotions, they are simply experiencing lots of ups and downs.

Personification

GIving human-like characteristics to nonhuman objects.

An illustration of Personification
Lightning danced across the sky.

Simile

A comparison using "like" or "as.

An illustration of a simile
As blind as a bat.

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