Elizabethan Era by dalyla ruiz

thesis:In the life of the Elizabethan Era, there were many engaging things such as, Fashion and Daily Life. Elizabethan Drama and Shakespeare had a impact on literature today.

Daily Life:

Daily life in Elizabethan Era

Quote#1: "These years were often considered to be a golden age in English history, have focused mainly on the lives of the era's wealthy nobles. (Nobles were the elite men and women who held social titles.) The nobles held great power and frequently lived colorful and extravagant lives, but they made up only about three percent of the population. Although the vast majority of the Elizabethan population was quite poor, few firsthand historical records of their daily lives have survived" (Palliser 1).

Commentary#1: Noblemen and noblewomen were the main focus because they held a great power in the classes. The nobles have a colorful and extravagant life. But they did only make three percent of the population. With the vast majority of the people being quite poor. With a few firsthand historical records to see how they survived their daily life.

Quote#2: "Members of the lower classes in England were mainly uneducated, so they did not usually keep journals or written records describing their own lives. They could not afford to have their portraits painted nor to preserve their humble homes `for future generations. Historians agree, though, that daily life for the majority of Elizabethans had little to do with courtly life, and much to do with working hard to earn a meager living" (Palliser 1).

Commentary#2: Lower classes in England were mainly uneducated, and just trying to work hard to earn a quality life. They couldn't afford portraits painted or preserve their homes for their future generations.They didn't usually write journals or written records describing their own lives or life back then. Historians do agree that the didn't have much to do with the court life.

Quote#3: "The working classes of England had always had a difficult life. Under the feudal system of the Middle Ages (the period in European history lasting from c. 500 to c. 1500), powerful lords owned and governed local districts, which were usually made up of peasant families and ranged from fifty to a few hundred people. (Peasants were farmers who worked in the fields owned by wealthy lords.) About 95 percent of the population of England lived in these rural districts" (Palliser 2).

Commentary#3: The Middle Ages lasting between c. 500 to c. 1500. had powerful lords owned and governed local districts. In each district were usually made up by fifty to a few hundred peasant families. About 95 percent of the population lived in these rural districts.

Daily life in Elizabethan Era

Quote#4: "The peasant farmers performed almost all of the labor. They farmed the land: about one-third of the land solely for the lord; a portion to support the local church; and the rest for their own use. Their daily lives were regulated by the seasons, and they tended to work from sunup to sundown, rarely traveling beyond their own village. The sick and elderly relied on the kindness of the lord for survival. Peasant life was usually fairly stable, but there was almost no chance of escaping the grinding toil from one generation to the next" (Palliser 2).

Commentary#4: The peasant farmers did almost all the farm labor. With the money that they made, one-third of the land solely for the lord, a portion to support their local church, and the rest was their to use. The seasons confide the daily lives. They went to work from sunup to sundown, and did not usually go beyond their village. The lords had the reliance of the sick and elderly to survival. Peasant Life was hard enough, but with no chance on going up in the classes.

lQuote#5: "England's farming economy was forever changed by the outbreak of a terrible plague, or infectious disease, that arrived on the European continent in 1348, killing more than one-fourth of the population in a few years. Continued outbreaks of the plague are estimated to have killed from one-third to one-half of Europe's population by 1400. So many people died that many villages were left without lord's, fields were left without farmers, and children were left without parents. With so many laborers dead, lords no longer had an easy supply of labor to farm their lands. By the early sixteenth century laborers found they could demand more money and better working conditions. For the first time it became possible for some enterprising peasants to take over the lands made vacant by the plague and become landowners themselves" (Palliser 3).

Commentary#5: After the plague in the middle 1300 that so many died from many villages they were left without lords and fields without workers and children without parents. With a lot of farmers dead, no lords had an easy supply to work their land. In the early sixteenth century laborers found out that they can demand more money and better work condition.

Quote#6: "The literature of the 45-year reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603) encompasses two literary periods: the end of the Early Tudor era in the 1560s and the extraordinary age that bears her name. The term Elizabethan is sometimes used to embrace literary activity up to the death of Shakespeare (1616), but the latter part of Shakespeare's career properly belongs to the Jacobean era" (Edward 1).

Commentary#6: 45-year reign of Queen Elizabeth had a experience two literary periods and the death of Shakespeare in 1616 and to his career at a actor, writer, and produce.

Daily life in Elizabethan era

Theater:

Quote#1: "The arts in Elizabethan England, drama was the most popular, and left behind the most enduring legacy. Not a single theater existed in England until well after Elizabeth I (1533–1603) took the throne in 1558. Within two decades of the building of the first major theater in the mid-1570s, however, a huge and varied body of Elizabethan comedy, tragedy, revenge plays, and history chronicles arose"(Benson 1).

Commentary#1: Drama was a big part of Elizabethan, but a single theater wasn't built until mid-1570s when the first major theater was built. The play range from comedy, tragedy, revenge plays, and history chronicles

Quote#2: "At the beginning of the Elizabethan Era, the period associated with the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603) that is often considered to be a golden age in English history, most English drama was based on two ancient genres: mystery plays and morality plays. Mystery plays were simple enactments of scenes from the Bible. Performed in churches or churchyards, they were popular on religious holidays like Christmas and Easter" (Benson 2).

Commentary#2: Before any theater was built the had performed in churches or churchyards. English drama was based on two ancient genres: mystery plays and morality plays. Most mystery plays were from the Bible. Christmas and Easter were the popular religious holidays to perform.

Quote#3: "Small groups of four to ten adult men and possibly a boy or two. Women were not permitted to act on stage until long after the Elizabethan Era, so female parts were played by boys or men dressed as women. The acting companies traveled from town to town carrying their stage scenery and costumes in wagons. Although most townspeople were eager to be entertained, the local authorities and religious leaders viewed the acting companies as a threat to the morals, health, and safety of their towns" (Benson 5).

Commentary#3: Woman were not permitted to act on stage until long after the Elizabethan Era. Female parts were played by boys or men dressed as woman. Acting companies traveled from town to town, also carrying their scenery and costumes on a wagon. Local authorities and religious leader view the acting companies as a threat to their morals, health, and safety of their towns.

A play in Elizabethan Era

Quote#4: "At the time actors were not viewed as working artists; they were usually scorned for being homeless and unemployed. Indeed, though some acting troops were honest professionals, others were notorious for committing petty crimes and behaving improperly" (Benson 5).

Commentary#4: Some acting troops were honest professionals, others were notorious for committing petty crimes and behaving improperly. Actors weren't seen as working artists at the time.

Quote#5: "The large amphitheaters outside the city attracted people of all classes, but these were not the only places where dramas were performed. The most prestigious site for drama was the royal court. Elizabeth was extremely fond of theater. Initially her favorite nobles tried to amuse her by presenting their own plays, but as the London theater improved the queen preferred the professionals" (Benson 12).

Commentary#5: Elizabeth was amazingly fond or the theater, when her favorite nobles tried to impress her by presenting their own play. As the theater improved Elizabeth preferred professionals. The theater outside of the city attracted people from all classes.

Quote#6: "In 1583 Elizabeth instructed her Master of the Revels to bring together a company of the top actors in England. Leading actors were selected from all the good acting companies and these became the Lord Chamberlain's Men. For actors nothing promised a brighter or more lucrative future than being selected to play in the royal court" (Benson 12).

Commentary#6: In 1583 Elizabethan told her Master of the Revels to bring a company of the top actors in England. Actors promised a brighter and lucrative future since they were elected to be in the royal court.

The Globe Theater

Quote#7: "In 1599, Burbage's theater was torn down and its timbers were used by Shakespeare and his company to build the Globe Theatre. This was the theater for which Shakespeare wrote most of his plays" (Anderson 3).

Commentary#7: The theater that Shakespeare wrote most of his plays was the Globe theater. Usually the Burgage's theater was torn down in 1599. The timbers were used to build the Globe theater.

Quote#8: "It would be many years before woman appeared on-stage in the professional English theater. In Shakespeare's day, Juliet would have been played by a trained actor boy" (Anderson 7).

Commentary#8: Juliet was played by a trained actor boy. It would be my years until woman appeared on a professional stage.

Quote#9: "By 1592, Shakespeare had already become an actor and a playwright. By 1594, he was a charter member of the theatrical company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, which was later to become the King's Men. Shakespeare worked with this company for the rest of his life. Year after year he provided it with plays, almost on demand. Shakespeare was the ultimate professional writer. He had a theater that needed plays, actors who needed parts, and a family that needed to be fed" (Anderson 5).

Commentary#9: Shakespeare was an actor and playwright by 1594. He had a theatrical company named Lord Chamberlain's Men, then later became King's Men. He worked on this company for the rest of his life. Shakespeare was the ultimate professional writer, having plays on demand year after year.

Quote#10: "Romeo and Juliet was probably among the early plays that Shakespeare wrote, between 1594 ad 1596. By 1612, when he returned to Stratford to live the life of a prosperous retired gentleman, Shakespeare had written thirty-seven plays, including such masterpieces as Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth. Shakespeare's plays are still produced all over the world. During a Broadway season in the 1980s, one critic estimated that if Shakespeare were alive, he would be receiving $25,000 a week royalties for a production of Othello alone. The play was attracting larger audiences than any other non musical production in town. Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616, at the age of fifty-two. He is buried under the old stone in the chancel of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford" (Anderson 6, 7).

Commentary#10: Shakespeare plays are still produced today. If he were still alive he would received $25,000 a week in royalties. He return to Stratford to live a prosperous retired gentleman, Shakespeare has written thirty-seven plays, including Julius Caesar, Hamlet, Othello, King lear, and Macbeth. Shakespeare died on April 23, 1616, he was fifty-two.

William Shakespeare

Fashion:

Upper Class Fashion

Quote#1: "The Elizabethan Era is known for the elaborate outfits that men and women wore to court and elite social functions. Extremely detailed portraits of the wealthy have given us a clear idea of how they dressed. The wealthy wore furs and jewels, and the cloth of their garments featured extravagant embroidery. But theirs was not the typical fashion of the times. The poor and even the middle classes dressed more simply. However, few detailed portraits or records of the clothing of the poor remain" (Palliser 15).

Commentary#1 : It is clear that Elizabethan Era had a lot of extravagant outfits in the royal court. They jewels, fur, and featured complex embroidery. The poor and some what of the middle class dressed more simply. Some records paintings that still existed give few details on the poor clothing.

Quote#2: "By Elizabeth's acts, only royalty could wear the color purple and only the highest nobility could wear the color red. Ermine, a type of fur, was to be worn only by the royal family, gold could be worn only by nobles of the rank of earl or higher, and fur trims of any type were limited to people whose incomes were extremely high. The amount of detail in the sumptuary acts was remarkable, as can be seen in this excerpt from the act regarding women's clothing" (Palliser 17).

Commentary#2: Purple and Ermine, a type of fur that the royal court could only wear. Red was wore by the highest nobility could wear. Gold could be wore by the earl or higher ranking nobles. Fur trimming of any sort was limited by people whose income was extremely high. The high detail of clothing was focused more on women's clothing.

Quote#3: "Elizabeth claimed the purpose of the sumptuary laws was to prohibit her subjects from wasting huge amounts of money on clothes. But the laws were also intended to preserve the existing order of social classes. As the incomes of the middle class increased, they were able to afford to live and dress like aristocrats. Thus it became increasingly important to regulate the garments of the various classes in order to maintain the established social order" (Palliser 18).

Commentary#3: The middle class were getting rich and could afford clothes and live like nobleman and noblewoman. Elizabeth create the sumptuary laws, for her people can be see in the right social class and not waste their money on clothing.

Middle Class Fashion

Quote#4: "The queen, as the highest-ranking person in the nation, was dressed the most elaborately, and she took this outward display of her position seriously. Although the punishment for wearing clothing prohibited by the sumptuary laws was a fine or worse, the laws were generally not enforced anywhere but in the royal court. However, purple and red dyes, velvet, gold cloth, and other forbidden garb were highly expensive, and poverty excluded the poor majority from wearing them. The poor, by necessity, dressed for their work: men wore boots, pants, a vest, shirt, and hat, while women wore an under skirt with an outer skirt over it, a bodice, shirt, and hat. Young boys and girls alike were dressed in skirts until the age of about six. After that age children were dressed in smaller versions of adult clothing" (Palliser 18).

Commentary#4: The poor was dress mostly for working. Men wore boots, pants, a vest, shirt, and hat while Woman wore a under skirt with an outer skirt over it, a bodice, shirt, and a hat. Children are dress alike until the age of six, after that age children dressed like smaller version of adult clothing. However the queen was dressed more elaborately, with the sumptuary law in placed the punishment was a fine or even worse , with the laws general not enforced anywhere but the royal court. Purple and red dyes, gold cloths, velvet, were highly expensive that excluded the poor social class from wearing it.

Quote#5: "In Elizabethan England one's clothing provided an observer with instant knowledge of one's social status. With a growing middle class, the rich and powerful clung to their age-old distinction of wearing clothes that made it immediately clear that they outranked others. Sumptuary laws, or statutes regulating how extravagantly people of the various social classes could dress, had been in effect for many years in England. Soon after taking the throne Elizabeth passed her own sumptuary acts, preserving the old standards and setting out in great detail what the different social ranks were allowed to wear" (Palliser 16).

Commentary#5: With the place of the Sumptuary law, Elizabethan England could prove what social class they were in. But with the middle class growing rich, it made them by more expensive clothes that the royal court would buy, it was cleared that they were outranking each other. After taking the throne Elizabeth pass her own sumptuary acts. Setting out in grand detail what the different social ranks were allowed to wear.

Lower Class Fashion

Works Cited:

Anderson, Robert. “Shakespeare and his Theater: A Perfect Match.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 778-80.

---. “WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE’S LIFE: A GENIUS FROM STRATFORD.” Holt Literature & Language Arts: Mastering the California Standards: Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, by G. Kylene Beers et al., Austin, Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 2003, pp. 776-77.

“Daily life in the Elizabethan Era.” Palliser, D. M. The Age of Elizabeth: England Under the Later Tudors, 1547–1603. 2d ed. London and New York: Longman, 1992.

“Elizabethan Drama.” Gale Virtual Reference Library, “Elizabethan Drama.” Elizabethan World Reference Library, edited by Sonia G. Benson and Jennifer York Stock, vol. 1: Almanac, UXL, 2007, pp. 163-179. Gale Virtual Reference Library, go.galegroup.com/ps/i.do?p=GVRL&sw=w&u=tmulvusd&v=2.1&id=GALE%7CCX2587000020&it=r&asid=36fcb4f0f8f8f5b1a612a24b7d9db96b. Accessed 4 Dec. 2016.

“Elizabethan period.” Quinn, Edward. “Elizabethan period.” A Dictionary of Literary and Thematic Terms, Second Edition. New York: Facts On File, Inc., 2006. Bloom’s Literature. Facts On File, Inc. www.fofweb.com/activelink2.asp?

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