Artistic Director's Report April 2017

Gratuitous Penny and Justin photo

Repertory

When you're doing rep, it's about the conviction that all the work is essential and valuable: that a farce can have as profound an impact as a contemporary drama. That all the characters you bring to life are worthy of your honest, truthful, nonjudgmental portrayal. Every play and every character has a "deep story" - one that goes beyond the first impression, the simple categorization.

New members of our acting company

Top: CJ Salvani, Gina Velez, Claudio Venancio; Middle: Pat Moran, Josh Zwick, Donovan Woods; Bottom: Portland Thomas, Bettina Lobo

Returning acting company

Designs

She loves me by masteroff, harnick & Bock

Sometimes, as these characters find, we have to be willing to sit across from someone we think we hate - with whom we think we share nothing in common, with whom we think there could not possibly be anything on which we agree or even ways in which we see the same world – and discover that there may be plenty to love after all. Will wonders never cease? - Michael Perlman, Director

She Loves Me - costumes by Asa Benally

She Loves Me - costumes by Asa Benally

She Loves Me - costumes by Asa Benally

The Syringa Tree by Pamela Gien

One of the most crucial societal liberties is the freedom to choose where you want to live; an ability to migrate and habitate and call your country home. To weave your thread of experience into the tapestry of American life. And in an age where that freedom to exist is being threatened more and more—and by countries we once thought of as sanctuaries—it has become of utmost importance to preach the message of inclusion through stories that shed light on our mistakes. - Tosin Morohunfola, Director

The Syringa Tree - scenic design by Matthew Schlief

Arsenic and Old Lace by Joseph Kesselring

Many critics believe that Joseph Kesselring intended the Brewster house as a metaphor for the dark side of American history. Mortimer’s attempts to balance his love for his Aunts with his family’s murderous history is a metaphor for every American’s struggle with the contradictions of American myth and our often violent history. - Jessica Jackson, program dramaturgy

Arsenic and Old Lace - costume design by Kate Mott

Arsenic and Old Lace - costume design by Kate Mott

Arsenic and Old Lace - costume design by Kate Mott

Talley's Folly by Lanford Wilson

“[she] came to me during the rehearsals of Fifth of July and asked what Matt had been like; what he looked like and sounded like. Sally spends so much of the play reminiscing about him, she wanted a specific image to call up as she talks about their life together….That was the genesis of Talley’s Folly. Imagining Matt and Sally on a date – this big, sexy, clumsy Jew coming from St. Louis down to Lebanon, Missouri, where nobody had ever seen a Jew before – was very exciting. I knew immediately that I wanted this to be unlike anything I had written. It would be much lighter, with a gloriously happy ending. But I also knew that nobody would trust me. I had written so many bloodbaths, that the audience would be sitting there saying, ‘He’s gonna kill her. He’s gonna finally get mad and strangle her.’ So at the opening of the play I had to reassure the audience that this really was going to end up a valentine.” - Lanford Wilson

Talley's Folly - scenic design by Matthew Schlief

Talley's Folly - costumes by Tatyana DePavloff

General Store by Brian Watkins

“The thing under my bed waiting to grab my ankle isn't real. I know that, and I also know that if I'm careful to keep my foot under the covers, it will never be able to grab my ankle.” - Stephen King

General Store - scenic design by Robert Mark Morgan

General Store - costumes by Clare Henkel

Pants on Fire created by John DiAntonio, Jessica Jackson, Brian Kusic, Graham Ward, Caitlin Wise, Joe Montelione & Renee Prince

Your voice can change the story. Even if you're a kid.

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