Accountants and Auditors By Jecoby deloach

Nature of Work :Most accountants and auditors work full time. In 2014, about 1 in 5 worked more than 40 hours per week. Overtime hours are typical at certain times of the year, such as at the end of the budget year or during tax season.

Job Outlook:Employment of accountants and auditors is projected to grow 11 percent from 2014 to 2024, faster than the average for all occupations. In general, employment growth of accountants and auditors is expected to be closely tied to the health of the overall economy. As the economy grows, more workers should be needed to prepare and examine financial records.

Projections Data: 130,750 projected jobs

Training, Qualifications and Advancement:Most accountant and auditor positions require at least a bachelor’s degree in accounting or a related field. Some employers prefer to hire applicants who have a master’s degree, either in accounting or in business administration with a concentration in accounting every accountant filing a report with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is required by law to be a Certified Public Accountant (CPA). Many other accountants choose to become a CPA to enhance their job prospects or to gain clients. Many employers will often pay the costs associated with the CPA exam.

Employment:Accountants and auditors who have earned professional recognition, especially as Certified Public Accountants (CPAs), should have the best prospects. Job applicants who have a master’s degree in accounting or a master’s degree in business with a concentration in accounting also may have an advantage.

Earnings:The best-paid 10 percent earned roughly $118,930, while the lowest-paid made approximately $41,400.

Credits:

Created with images by martaposemuckel - "bank note euro bills"

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