Marriage

What is a betrothal?

A betrothal is a formal engagement or marriage by a priest.

What are 3 marriage customs?

Marriage in the Elizabethan age had many customs. Three of them are, the parents chose the partner for their son. The woman had no choice. Also marrying someone in another social group was not recommended. Lastly the wife had to bring a dowry. A dowry is something of value that the bride would give the groom. That gift would have to be returned if the wife ever wanted divorce or ever got abused.

How is the intention to marry announced? What if it wasn't?

The couple has to fill out banns in order to get married because if anybody had any impediments to marriage the wedding could be called off. It could also be called off if the couple was too closely related. The wedding could not go on without the banns filled out.

How important was the ring to the Elizabethans?

The ring ceremony was very important. The ring ceremony started the transfer of the bride from her old family into the new family she is starting with the groom.

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ROMEO & JULIET. - The balcony scene (Act III, scene 5) from William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet": wood engraving, English, c1880.. Fine Art. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/140_1659318/1/140_1659318/cite. Accessed 9 Mar 2017.

Marriage. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016.quest.eb.com/search/139_1967336/1/139_1967336/cite. Accessed 9 Mar 2017.

Detail from the tapestry "The Betrothal of Mary and Joseph, the Annunciation and the Visitation" from the series of "The Story of the Virgin Mary". The betrothal with priests joining the hands of the couple. Country of Origin: France. Date/Period: Early 16th C. Material Size: Wool and silk 1.54 x 5.84 m. Credit Line: Werner Forman Archive/ Hermitage Museum. HS. Photography. Britannica ImageQuest, Encyclopædia Britannica, 25 May 2016. quest.eb.com/search/300_3422414/1/300_3422414/cite. Accessed 9 Mar 2017.

Cohen, Elizabeth S., and Thomas V. Cohen. Daily Life in Renaissance Italy. Westport, CT, Greenwood Press, 2001.

Grendler, Paul F. Encyclopedia of the Renaissance, Vol 1-6. New York, Scribner's Published in Association with the Renaissance Society of America, 1999.

Cohen, Elizabeth S., and Thomas V. Cohen. Daily Life in Renaissance Italy. Westport, CT, Greenwood Press, 2001.

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