Photography Presentation joshua nguyen

Story

STORY - A MOMENT IN TIME; INSPIRING A MOMENT

Light

LIGHT - SHOWS BALANCED LIGHTING OR USE OF SHADOWS

Movement

MOVEMENT - ACTION SHOT THAT IS NOT BLURRY

Black and White Portrait

BLACK AND WHITE PORTRAIT - OF PERSON OR OBJECT

BACKGROUND - A background is normally considered secondary to the subject. This is by virtue of its relative importance compared to the main subject. The main emphasis is placed on the central subject.

Leading Lines

LEADING LINES - LINES THAT LEAD TO THE SUBJECT

LEADING LINES - Leading lines are one of the most effective and under-utilized composition tools available to photographers. They’re used to draw a viewers attention to a specific part of the frame, whether it’s a person, or a vanishing point in the background of the frame. Our eyes are naturally drawn along lines and paths in photos, as they tend to make us feel as if we’re standing within the photo itself. It’s important to understand how to use leading lines effectively, because if they’re used incorrectly, they will be more detrimental than anything.

When we look at a photo our eye is naturally drawn along lines. By thinking about how you place lines in your composition, you can affect the way we view the image, pulling us into the picture, towards the subject, or on a journey "through" the scene. There are many different types of line - straight, diagonal, curvy, zigzag, radial etc - and each can be used to enhance our photo's composition.

Low Perspective Viewpoint

VIEWPOINT - (LOW PERSPECTIVE) LOOKING AT A SUBJECT

High Perspective Viewpoint

VIEWPOINT (HIGH PERSPECTIVE) - LOOKING DOWN ON SUBJECT

Before photographing your subject, take time to think about where you will shoot it from. Our viewpoint has a massive impact on the composition of our photo, and as a result it can greatly affect the message that the shot conveys. Rather than just shooting from eye level, consider photographing from high above, down at ground level, from the side, from the back, from a long way away, from very close up, and so on.

VIEWPOINT - A way of looking at or thinking about something.

How many times have you taken what you thought would be a great shot, only to find that the final image lacks impact because the subject blends into a busy background? The human eye is excellent at distinguishing between different elements in a scene, whereas a camera has a tendency to flatten the foreground and background, and this can often ruin an otherwise great photo. Thankfully this problem is usually easy to overcome at the time of shooting - look around for a plain and unobtrusive background and compose your shot so that it doesn't distract or detract from the subject.

Close Up

CLOSE UP PERSPECTIVE - UP CLOSE PICTURE OF A SUBJECT

Depth

DEPTH - SHOWS LAYERS OF DEPTH

Placing your main subject off-center, as with the rule of thirds, creates a more interesting photo, but it can leave a void in the scene which can make it feel empty. You should balance the "weight" of your subject by including another object of lesser importance to fill the space.

DEPTH - SHOWING THE DIFFERENT LAYERS WITHIN A PHOTO

Because photography is a two-dimensional medium, we have to choose our composition carefully to conveys the sense of depth that was present in the actual scene. You can create depth in a photo by including objects in the foreground, middle ground and background. Another useful composition technique is overlapping, where you deliberately partially obscure one object with another. The human eye naturally recognizes these layers and mentally separates them out, creating an image with more depth.

Framing

FRAMING - A SUBJECT FRAMED BY ANOTHER OBJECT

The world is full of objects which make perfect natural frames, such as trees, archways and holes. By placing these around the edge of the composition you help to isolate the main subject from the outside world. The result is a more focused image which draws your eye naturally to the main point of interest.

FRAMING - Is the technique of drawing attention to the subject of your image by blocking other parts of the image with something in the scene.

Forced Perspective

FORCED PERSPECTIVE - (STAGED SHOT THAT LOOKS REAL)

Reaction

REACTION - LAUGHING, CRYING, PUZZLED, SCARED, SURPRISED ETC.

Symmetry and Patterns

SYMMETRY OR PATTERNS - SHOWS BALANCE ON ALL SIDES OF PICTURE

We are surrounded by symmetry and patterns, both natural and man-made., They can make for very eye-catching compositions, particularly in situations where they are not expected. Another great way to use them is to break the symmetry or pattern in some way, introducing tension and a focal point to the scene.

BALANCE AND SYMMETRY - The creation of an image which can be separated into two equal parts (this can be horizontally or vertically). Both of the separate parts of the image should then look same, or if not the same should look similar. Not only can you make both parts of the image look the same or similar bur each part can be a mirror image of the other part. Therefore Symmetry in Photography results in a feeling of unanimity and harmony.

BALANCING ELEMENTS - Balance is a composition technique in photography that juxtaposes images within a frame so that the objects are of equal visual weight. When different parts of a photo command your attention equally, perfect balance is achieved.

Cropping

CROPPING - (USING BEFORE AND AFTER PHOTOS)

CROPPING - Is the removal of the outer parts of an image to improve framing, accentuate subject matter or change aspect ratio.

Often a photo will lack impact because the main subject is so small it becomes lost among the clutter of its surroundings. By cropping tight around the subject you eliminate the background "noise", ensuring the subject gets the viewer's undivided attention.

Rule of Thirds

RULE OF THIRDS - MAIN SUBJECT IS ON ONE OF THE 1/3 LINES

Imagine that your image is divided into 9 equal segments by 2 vertical and 2 horizontal lines. The rule of thirds says that you should position the most important elements in your scene along these lines, or at the points where they intersect. Doing so will add balance and interest to your photo. Some cameras even offer an option to superimpose a rule of thirds grid over the LCD screen, making it even easier to use.

RULE OF THIRDS - The rule of thirds is a "rule of thumb" or guideline which applies to the process of composing visual images such as designs, films, paintings, and photographs.[1] The guideline proposes that an image should be imagined as divided into nine equal parts by two equally spaced horizontal lines and two equally spaced vertical lines, and that important composition elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections. Proponents of the technique claim that aligning a subject with these points creates more tension, energy and interest in the composition than simply centering the subject.

Experimentation

With the dawn of the digital age in photography we no longer have to worry about film processing costs or running out of shots. As a result, experimenting with our photos' composition has become a real possibility; we can fire off tons of shots and delete the unwanted ones later at absolutely no extra cost. Take advantage of this fact and experiment with your composition - you never know whether an idea will work until you try it.

Composition in photography is far from a science, and as a result all of the "rules" above should be taken with a pinch of salt. If they don't work in your scene, ignore them; if you find a great composition that contradicts them, then go ahead and shoot it anyway. But they can often prove to be spot on, and are worth at least considering whenever you are out and about with your camera.

EXPERIMENTATION - Technique can be defined as anything that one uses to alter or otherwise change a photography in a way that differs from just taking a photograph.

Favorites

THESE ARE MY FAVORITE PHOTOS BECAUSE THEY ARE THE PHOTOS OF MY FAVORITE SUBJECT AND MODEL. JUST THE SHEER SENSE OF MOOD AND FACIAL EXPRESSIONS MAKES YOU SEEM AS IF YOU CAN PORTRAY THE FEELINGS AND MOOD OF THE SUBJECT. IT I S ALSO MY FAVORITE BECAUSE THE DEPTH OF COLOR AND CRISPNESS WITHIN THE PHOTO IS REMARKABLE.

Careers in Photography

SOME CAREERS IN PHOTOGRAPHY I AM INTERESTED IN ARE FASHION PHOTOGRAPHER BECAUSE I LIKE CERTAIN CLOTHING AND DESIGN PIECES IN FASHION AND I FEEL LIKE I HAVE A UNIQUE WAY OF PORTRAYING MY MODELS. I AM INTERESTED IN A WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER BECAUSE I WANT TO SEE DIFFERENT ANIMALS AND INTERACT WITH MY SUBJECTS. I REALLY LIKE A WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER BECAUSE I WANT TO CAPTURE PEOPLES HAPPIEST TIMES OF THEIR LIFE AND SEEING MY WORK AS A MEMORY THAT WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN. THE LAST CAREER I AM INTERESTED IN IS AN ASTRO PHOTOGRAPHER BECAUSE BEING AN ASTRO PHOTOGRAPHER REQUIRES SKILL WITHIN YOUR EQUIPMENT TO CAPTURE ALL THE STARS AND COLOR VARIATIONS AND BRIGHTNESS IN THE SKY.

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