Life in the Industrial Revolution Jake Nordmark, Michael Aloisio, Ruth Elendu and Justin Volz

The Peterloo Massacre

  • The Peterloo Massacre occurred at St Peter's Field, Manchester, England, on 16 August 1819
  • 60,000–80,000 had gathered to demand the reform of parliamentary representation
  • After the Napoleonic wars there was widespread famine and unemployment
  • The Manchester Patriotic Union was led by a well known radical orator Henry Hunt
  • Local magistrates called on the military authorities to arrest Hunt and several others, and to disperse the crowd
  • 15 people were killed and 400–700 were injured
  • When news of the massacre began to spread, the population of Manchester and surrounding districts were horrified and outraged
  • The immediate effect of Peterloo was a crackdown on reform

City Life

  • Very few people lived in cities before the Industrial Revolution
  • Only 17% of Europe's population lived in urban areas
  • Rapid population increase, around 54% of people lived in urban areas
  • Urbanization rate was unexpected, as well as hard to control, and keep stable
  • Poor living and working conditions were established as a result of high demand for industrial work
  • Cities wanted to move people out of the congested and poor areas, and push them to more conveniently designed and more attractive areas, that were not considered as urban, while also encouraging the industrial expansion.
  • Many people remained in the poor and poverty stricken areas of the cities where crime and sickness were major issues
  • High crime rates in the new, rural areas would lead to even more pushes for less poverty and sickness as well as new and improved drainage systems, as well as more caution for sanitary practices.
  • The poor sewage and draining systems of the time caused sewage to pollute the streets, and lack of a proper garbage disposal system also caused the streets to be disgusting, and uninhabitable.
  • New inventions would eventually lead to making urban areas cleaner

Roles of an Industrial Family

Men
  • Bread-winners of the family
  • First to eat and then the rest of the family ate what was left
  • Made up most of the working industry
  • Paid the highest
  • Did the "hardest" work in most industries (ex. coal)
Women
  • Overworked, exhausted, and vulnerable to disease and faced premature death.
  • When women were the main bread-winners, they almost never received wages sufficient to meet a family’s needs
  • Employed in the lowest position in factory work and textile industries
  • Received 30 to 50% of men’s wages
  • Factory work undermined the ability of women to take care of their children
  • Mothers were obligated to leave them unwatched at home during factory hours and sometimes drugged them with mixtures readily available
  • As farmers or cottagers, women had been able to work and supervise the children
  • Wives also contributed to the house by making clothes, raising a pig, tending a potato patch, and performed daily household chores
  • Responsible for running the house, managing the family income, and taking care of e children
  • Wives also contributed to the house by making clothes, raising a pig, tending a potato patch, and performed daily household chores
Children
  • Child labor was widespread during this time
  • Lighter boys and underfed girls were faced with heavy labor that undermined their health
  • Received 5 to 25% of men’s wages
  • Employed in the lowest position in factory work and textile industries
  • Given heavy responsibilities at an early age
  • Were employed underground because they were able to crawl in narrow mine shafts and pick up loose cotton from under machines
  • Babies were often neglected, their mortality rate was extremely high
  • The textile industry employed children as young as the age of 5 or 6
  • Because of their small hands they were hired as “doffers,” taking bobbins off frames and replacing them
  • As technological advances relieved both problems, the need for children in the work force decreased

Credits:

All photos from Google Images

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.