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2030 Skills Scorecard Global Business Coalition for Education

Introduction

Estimates indicate that by 2030, there will be 1.5 billion school-age children in low- and middle-income countries. If current trends continue, well over half of them — 880 million children — will not be on track to acquire the most basic skills they need to succeed in the workforce. This new skills scorecard highlights the world’s skills deficit so we can understand and help address it.

Under current trends, the workforce of tomorrow looks woefully unprepared for Industry 4.0.

The workplace of the future will look very different from that of today. Automation, digitization, and other forms of technology will wipe out millions of jobs while, at the same time, create many new opportunities. Next generation workers must be prepared to participate in what is called the Fourth Industrial Revolution or Industry 4.0 for short. Education must rise to the challenge of delivering the necessary skills for the future and move beyond the traditional subjects to include entrepreneurship, soft leadership, technology, and workforce readiness.

Below, you will find social media infographics for each region and a suggested post in blue text. Download all graphics here.

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Sub-Saharan Africa is already the world’s youngest region with three fifths of its population under 25, and its youth population is growing at a fast rate. In the coming decades, one third of global youth will be in Sub-Saharan Africa. This increase in working-age population could create a window of opportunity which boosts productivity and economic growth, but current employment and skills trends are worrying. Only 17% of young people are projected to complete secondary education with basic skills by 2030; this region will be home to the largest concentration of young people not prepared with the skills to productively participate in the workforce.

On current trends, only 17% of 426 million school-age African children and youth in 2030 are projected to be on track to complete secondary school and learn basic secondary skills. Learn more in @GBCEducation’s 2030 #YouthSkills Scorecard. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
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The Middle East and North Africa region has the highest levels of youth unemployment of any global region. Fewer than 1 in 4 youth aged 15-24 is working, which is largely drive by female youth unemployment. The unemployment rate for young women exceeds that of young men by about 20 percent. By 2030, almost 60 percent of school-age children are projected to be on track to complete secondary and attain basic skills, and the secondary school-age population in the MENA region is expected to increase by a third. Projected learning levels by country are mixed, with strong progress in some countries, and stagnation in other countries – especially those countries affected by conflict and impacted by the refugee crisis.

The Middle East and North Africa region has the highest levels of youth unemployment of any global region. Learn more in @GBCEducation’s 2030 #YouthSkills Scorecard. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
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South Asia has experienced some of the fastest economic growth rates globally. If strong investments in skills development are made, the region is poised to maintain growth in the coming decades. Today, South Asia is home to the largest number of young people of any global region, with almost half of its population of 1.9 billion below the age of 24. Youth unemployment remains high (at 9.8% in 2018) because of changing labor market demands and over — or under — qualification of job candidates. In most South Asian countries, the projected proportion of children and youth completing secondary education and learning basic secondary skills is expected to more than double by 2030. Still, on current trends, fewer than half of the region’s projected 400 million primary and secondary school-age children in 2030 are estimated to be on track to complete secondary education and attain basic workforce skills.

In most South Asian countries, the projected proportion of children and youth completing secondary education and learning basic secondary skills is expected to more than double by 2030. Learn more in @GBCEducation’s 2030 #YouthSkills Scorecard. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
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In order to overcome the middle-income trap in Latin American countries, there must be a greater focus on quality education and increasing the number of skilled workers. Other regions like East Asia and Europe have achieved sustained increases in income per capita by improving the stock and quality of skills and maintaining openness to innovation. Yet, many firms in Latin America report that they struggle to find employees with the right skills. Projections show that the number of children completing secondary school and learning basic workforce skills will improve in all Latin American countries in the next decade, but still only half of 102 million school-age youth in Latin America are estimated to be on track to achieve these skills by 2030.

Only half of 102 million school-age youth in Latin America are estimated to be on track to achieve basic workforce skills by 2030. Learn more in @GBCEducation’s 2030 #YouthSkills Scorecard. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
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The East Asia and the Pacific region is characterized by great diversity in terms of demographics and socio-economic progress, but common challenges related to technological change, employment landscape, and skills shortages are present throughout the region. Increasing numbers of employers are demanding highly skilled workers with transferable competencies like critical thinking, technical, socio-emotional and cross-cultural skills. Demographic trends, such as aging populations and increasing migration within and across countries, are further exacerbating skills shortages in some countries. On current trends, the proportion of children completing secondary education and attaining basic secondary skills will reach 79% before 2030. A majority of more populous low- and middle-income countries in the region, like Vietnam, Indonesia, and Philippines, will see strong improvement in skill levels between today and 2030.

The proportion of children completing secondary education and attaining basic secondary skills will reach 79% before 2030. Learn more in @GBCEducation’s 2030 #YouthSkills Scorecard. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ

Suggested Social Media Posts

  1. If trends continue, by 2030 more than half of all students in the world will not be on track to acquire the basic skills needed to succeed in work. @GBCEducation’s new #UNGA #YouthSkills Scorecard shows skills readiness by region today and in 2030. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
  2. We need a re-imagining of secondary education to meet the workforce demands of the future. See where each country stands in ensuring all young people achieve basic secondary skills. http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ
  3. Of 1.5 billion school-age children in low and middle income countries, well over half – 880 million — won’t be on track to acquire the minimum level of secondary skills by 2030. Where does each country stand in making progress to close the gap? http://bit.ly/2mzWXmZ

Credits:

Created with images by ernestoeslava • Element5 Digital • Brad Neathery • NeONBRAND • wu yi