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S-Term: Summer Academic Acceleration & Support presented by The Wheeler School & Wheeler Summer for Wheeler School Families

Get ready for Wheeler's S-TERM!

Working in partnership with The Wheeler School, Wheeler Summer will be offering its new "S-Term" — virtual Academic Acceleration and Support for all Wheeler School families this summer.

Lower School & Middle School Schedule: (2) 3-week options, June 15-July 3 & August 3-August 21. Upper School's schedule from June 15-August 21 is defined under their division section.

Under each division you will find; programs by grade level, tentative schedules, content specifics, teacher information & links for enrollment (by division).

This resource comes to you as an inclusion of your '19-'20 tuition. Enrollment will close for the first session on June 5th. *IMPORTANT* — when registering, please refer to student's grade level in '19-'20 school year.

LOWER SCHOOL

Below you will find Lower School S-Term classes offered by grade level for the first session (June 15-July 3). (An update for August classes will be communicated to you via email.) Most classes will take place on Tuesdays-Thursdays and will be scheduled between the hours of 9:00 am - 11:00 am. Please know that enrollment will determine which day and at what time the class will take place. This information, along with your child's schedule and Zoom links will be sent to you in email after the enrollment period closes. Spanish classes will be offered on Wednesdays only and take place at times designated by grade level. (This information can be found in the course description below under Specials.)

In order to take advantage of this resource enrollment is required. Enrollment is a commitment by your family to our faculty, as we have committed their time and efforts to support this program. Please read the course information below before enrolling so that you know which classes to enroll in. You do not need to enroll in every class offered for your child's grade level.

Please be sure to read the updated S-Term On-line Learning Policy before completing the enrollment form. The link to the enrollment form can be found after the class descriptions.

ELC (N-K)

Littlest Learners / Tuesdays & Thursdays: If you’re looking to have your child practice and apply their literacy, math and writing skills this summer, you’ve come to the right place! In a fun and interactive way, we will continue to build their skills by reading books together, journaling, playing games, diving into creative projects, developing a strong number sense in a hands on way and engage in stimulating conversations. Our weekly sessions will give them the opportunity to continue using and applying these skills while keeping them fresh and exciting! Led by: Meghan Haines & Courtney Deangelis-Thiele (Early Childhood Faculty)

Grade 1

1,2,3, Phonics & Me: Jump into this 45-minute class where your child will practice letter sounds and letter and number recognition. They will be exposed to blending and early reading strategies. Led by: Charlene Williams (Lower School Librarian)

1st Grade Math: First graders will deepen their understanding of place value to 100 and beyond. They will sharpen their double-digit addition and subtraction problem skills, hone their math facts, solve word problems using multiple strategies, practice telling time and working with money as well as reviewing measurement and geometry. The sessions will help students reason abstractly and quantitatively and preserve when solving problems. Led by: Kim Gustafson (Lower School Faculty)

Grade 2

Reading & Writing through Second: Readers will read engaging and informative, "Just Right" books with teacher-directed discussions that support vocabulary development. Writing activities will be based on stories read and will enhance student engagement with literature. Led by: Catherine Vaughan (Lower School Faculty)

2nd Grade Math: Second graders will extend their understanding of the base-ten system and develop an even deeper meaning of number sense. Students will work with multi-digit numbers (up to 1000) and use this to develop fluency with addition and subtraction triple-digit problems. They will work on solving word problems where they will use efficient strategies and their knowledge of math facts. Second graders will also review telling time, money, measurement and geometry. These sessions will help them reason abstractly and quantitatively and preserve when solving problems. Led by: Kim Gustafason (Lower School Faculty)

Grade 3

Reading & Writing through Third: Readers will read engaging and informative, "Just Right" books with teacher-directed discussions that support vocabulary development. Writing activities will be based on stories read and will enhance student engagement with literature. Led by: Catherine Vaughan (Lower School Faculty)

3rd Grade Math: Let’s come together to strengthen our math minds through number talks, problem solving and skill building practice. Grounding ourselves in place value and the power of number sense, we will work on math skills like multiplication, division, fractions and more. Join this group to gain some solid ground in your math thinking, grapple with engaging math challenges and prepare for what is to come in the fall. Led by: Bonnie Calderon (Early Childhood Faculty)

Grade 4

4th Grade Book Club: Using one of the texts from our Wheeler Library summer book list we will pace the chapters together and in conversation, pick apart all the layers. We will work on fluency, gain new vocabulary, notice figurative language and deepen your overall comprehension skills with this amazing book club experience. Led by: Bonnie Calderon (Early Childhood Faculty)

Problem Solving in Math: Children will use exemplars performance tasks to explore different problem solving strategies. This group will deepen their math thinking as we learn to look for patterns and find connections in our math work. Led by: Julie Abodeely (Lower School Faculty)

Grade 5

5th Grade Book Club: Using one of the texts from our Wheeler Library summer book list we will pace the chapters together and in conversation, pick apart all the layers. We will work on fluency, gain new vocabulary, notice figurative language and deepen your overall comprehension skills with this amazing book club experience. Led by: Bonnie Calderon (Early Childhood Faculty)

Problem Solving in Math: Children will use exemplars performance tasks to explore different problem solving strategies. This group will deepen their math thinking as we learn to look for patterns and find connections in our math work. Led by: Julie Abodeely (Lower School Faculty)

Specials

Spanish Language / Wednesdays / N-Gr.2 (9:30-10:15) / Gr.3-5 (10:30-11:15): Join Sra. Vivier for a class that incorporates the Spanish language with various Hispanic Cultures. Students will explore the rich Hispanic world of art, music, traditional foods/recipes, ancient folklore/myths/legends and special holidays. Classes will include storytelling, art and craft activities, age appropriate cooking, videos, songs and a look at a few popular Hispanic dances. Some classes will require students to have certain materials and a supply list will be emailed to the families prior to each class. Led by: Lupe Vivier (Lower School Faculty)

ArtOlé! / Thursdays / (Gr. 3-5): Students will have fun increasing their exposure to, and their knowledge of, the Spanish language, and Hispanic art and artists as they grow their artistic skills. We will offer inventive art projects with clear directions aided by visual examples, screencasts and videos. In this class, students will enjoy exploring the drawing, painting and building styles and techniques associated with Hispanic cultures through their own artwork. Led by: Lupe Vivier (Lower School Spanish) Bobbie Berking-Dalzell & Ryan Davis (Lower School Art Faculty)

To enroll in Lower School S-Term: Click Here.

MIDDLE SCHOOL

Below you will find Middle School S-Term classes offered by grade level. classes offered by grade level for the first S-Term Session (June 15-July 3). (An update for August classes will be communicated to you via email.) Most classes will take place on Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays and will be scheduled between the hours of 9:00 am - 11:00 am. Please know that enrollment will determine which day and at what time the class will take place. This information, along with your child's schedule and Zoom links will be sent to you in email after the enrollment period closes.

In order to take advantage of this resource enrollment is required. Enrollment is a commitment by your family to our faculty, as we have committed their time and efforts to support this program. Please read the course information below before enrolling so that you know which classes to enroll in. You do not need to enroll in every class offered for your child's grade level.

Please be sure to read the S-Term Virtual Learning Policy before completing the enrollment form. The link to the enrollment form can be found after the class descriptions.

Grade 6

6th Grade Math: This course will focus on reviewing the fundamental topics covered in 6th grade. Specific attention will be paid to foundational skills that are building blocks for concepts introduced in 7th grade. Students will practice integer operations, with positive and negative numbers, order of operations and fraction operations. We will build upon these skills to review percent and decimals applied to word problems. The goal is to help students understand basic mathematical concepts and develop creativity in solving complex real-life problems. Led by: Linda Leonard (Middle School Faculty)

Power Up with Persuasion: Kids are the best when it comes to the art of persuasion. Use the skills that are already in you to write fun and exciting persuasive stories, essays and speeches. Students will also work on grammar, sentence structure, and paragraph development. Led by: Charlene Williams (Lower School Librarian)

The Hero's Journey: What is a hero? Is the protagonist of every novel a "hero", or something different? How can we set up tension in a story using the events of a character's life? The Hero's Journey will help students to understand what elements contribute to a successful and compelling story by examining cases from their summer reading books and other supplemental material. Led by: Gabby David (Aerie Teacher & Wheeler Alum)

Grade 7

7th Grade Math: This course will review concepts introduced in 7th grade. Students will be given instruction and practice on such skills as proportional relationships and simplifying and solving Algebraic expressions and equations. There will be a specific focus on reviewing linear relationships taught in 7th grade that will be built upon in 8th grade. These concepts include making connections between linear rules, graphs and tables and understanding the representation of slope in these problems. The goal is for students to have a complete understanding of these concepts and apply them to real world situational problems. Led by: Linda Leonard (Middle School Faculty)

Book Worms!: Summer reading can be a challenge! What better way to process the adventures of our favorite heroines and heroes than by meeting in small groups every few days to discuss the latest chapters we've read? Book Worms! helps to keep students accountable by making sure we are all on the same page. In our small groups we will discuss plot developments, character arcs, and textual interpretations. Led by: Josh Primiano (Aerie Teacher & Auxiliary Programs Staff)

Visual Writing: Pictures can speak a thousand words. In this class, we will explore the many imagery and symbols that can be found visually. Through writing, students will use their own interpretations to identify the importance of seeing multiple perspectives. Students will also work on sentence structure, vocabulary enhancement, as well as, paragraph and essay writing. Led by: Gabby David (Aerie Teacher & Wheeler Alum)

Grade 8

8th Grade Math: This course will divided into two main areas. During the first Summer Session (June 15-July 3), we will review Algebraic skills taught in 8th grade including quadratics, operations with Rational Expressions, and radical. The second Summer Session will focus on Geometric concepts taught throughout their middle school years that will be built upon next year. Led by: Linda Leonard (Middle School Faculty)

Adventures in Creative Writing: Using writing prompts to help build their own imaginative world, students will explore different plots, characters and themes to aid in their creative thinking and problem solving skills. Students will learn that the plot can thicken with the most unimaginable twists and turns. Other skills will include grammar, importance of adverbs and adjectives to build a scene, and structural development. Led by: Gabby David (Aerie teacher & Wheeler Alum)

The Poet Society: Students will explore the feelings, emotions and meaning behind the words in poetry by breaking down the fundamentals. By understanding the benefits of writing poetry, poem structure, and deciphering imagery, students will stir up and strengthen their skills. Now there's some alliteration! Led by: Josh Primiano (Aerie Teacher & Auxiliary Programs Staff)

Specials

Research Skills / Mondays & Wednesdays / 11:00am-12:00pm (8th Grade only): For current 8th and 9th-grade students to get the opportunity to improve their use of Wheeler's citation software, database searching, and using the online library resources. We will explore the shift from MS library life to US library life. You will need a computer with Internet access, a wheelergmail account, and a Wheeler lunch number. Led by: Kate Covintree (Upper School Librarian)

To enroll in Middle School S-Term: Click Here.

UPPER SCHOOL SUMMER SKILLS & SEMINARS

The Upper School S-Term offers a variety of virtual seminars for students to further develop skills and stay engaged during the summer. Below you will find Upper School S-Term classes offered with corresponding days and times for all summer sessions (June 15-August 21).

Many Upper School Faculty have contributed to the proposed schedule and options below. Each workshop requires a minimum number of students to run with a maximum of 15 students, and are offered to the current 9th through 12th-grade students. They are included in the '19-'20 tuition, so there is no additional cost. In order to take advantage of this resource, enrollment is required.

If you see something that piques your interest but the time does not work for you, please email Annie White (anniewhite@wheelerschool.org) to inquire if there is flexibility for that particular seminar.

Confirmation of schedule and class Zoom links will be sent to you in email after the enrollment period closes. Please read the information below before enrolling.

Please be sure to read the S-Term Virtual Learning Policy before completing the enrollment form. The enrollment form can be found after the class descriptions.

Session One

June 15 -July 3, 2020 (3-week Session)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Detective Stories: Edgar Allan Poe & Sir Arthur Conan Doyle led by John Campbell (English Dept.)

Who doesn’t love a well-told whodunnit? Reading a finely wrought detective story and trying to solve the big mystery before the all-star sleuth is one of reading’s great pleasures! In this seminar, we’re going to look back to the supposed origins of the detective story in English and read several short stories about Edgar Allan Poe’s Inspector Dupin. From there, we’ll move on to one of the classic Sherlock Holmes novellas by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The class will consist of a vigorous discussion of each case, its detective’s methods, and, of course, the detective story as a form.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Her Discography led by Reina Thomas (History Dept.)

This course is part of the #sayhername history elective and during this seminar we will examine the experiences of black women in the US through media, specifically music. The major skill we will focus upon is the close reading of a text (song lyrics) and thinking about how music can be used as a primary and secondary source of knowledge.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Homer’s Odyssey led by John Campbell (English Dept.)

Do you love to read about heroes and the challenges they must overcome? Do you want to be able to tell people they’re stuck between Scylla and Charybdis—instead of a rock and a hard place—and know exactly what the saying means? Have you ever wondered how to escape from a Cyclops? If you’ve answered yes to any of these questions, then Homer’s Odyssey might just be the book for you! This June and July, we will read and discuss the journey-based epic while paying careful attention to allusions to Greek mythology, instances of exemplary ancient Greek social practices, and the defining elements of epic poetry as a genre. If you take this course, the whole world of epic poetry from the ancient world will open up to you. You’ll be better equipped to read and enjoy Homer’s Iliad; Vergil’s Aeneid; and, from the middle ages, Dante’s Inferno. Reading Homer’s Odyssey will help you better understand any literary text in which a geographical odyssey serves as a metaphor for the search for self. (six-week course, June & July)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Research Skills led by Kate Covintree (US Librarian)

For current 8th and 9th-grade students to get the opportunity to improve their use of Wheeler's citation software, database searching, and using the online library resources. We will explore the shift from MS library life to US library life. You will need a computer with Internet access, a wheelergmail account, and a Wheeler lunch number.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 1:00-2:00 PM, Physics of the Large Hadron Collider, led by Tammy Kjonaas (Science Dept.)

We will discuss the history and goals of the world’s largest science experiment, the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland. Students will learn some basics of particle physics and will analyze real data from the Compact Muon Solenoid. No prior physics experience required.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 3:00-4:00 PM, Intro to Organic Chemistry, led by Christine Perkins (Science Dept.)

The chemistry of the element carbon is so magnificently rich that we have created a complete descriptive language for its compounds and reactions. In this course you will learn about the infinite variety of carbon compounds, how we name them, and what they do. Come explore the magic of six protons! For current 10th, 11th and 12th-grade students.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Current Events led by Pam Levanos (Academic Support) and Reina Thomas (History Dept.)

Sharpen reading and note-taking skills by exploring contemporary issues through articles, news clips, and other forms of media.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Executive Function & Happiness led by Annie White (Academic Support)

What do you want to accomplish this summer? How are you going to achieve your goals? What are some strategies for intentional happiness? Let’s get you organized for a summer of satisfaction.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Graphic Nonfiction led by Kate Covintree (US Librarian)

How can a graphic adaptation of facts help us understand a situation? In this workshop, we will learn about the skills needed to read graphic texts and read graphic non-fiction to learn about real events. We may also try our hand at creating our own graphic nonfiction piece. Please have one or two graphic nonfiction books on hand to start.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1:00-2:00 PM, Conversational Spanish led by Elena Lledo Macau (Modern Languages)

A conversational class in Spanish in which reading material of different kinds (literature, social sciences, politics, etc.) will prompt discussion. Ideally, for students with a good level of Spanish.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 3:00-4:00 PM, Science of Music and Sound led by Christine Perkins (Science Dept.)

This seminar will examine the nature of sound and the physics and mathematics of music. We will explore such questions as: How are sounds created and how do they travel from one place to another? How do musical instruments work, and why do we perceive their sounds as different? What do physicists mean when they say that sound is a “wave”? You will receive an introduction to wave mechanics and then use your knowledge of waves to begin understanding the physics that underlie such musical principles as timbre, volume, harmony, intonation, and scales. With a hands-on component, please be prepared to find materials around your house to make homemade instruments.

*One Week Seminar: June 22-26th*

Daily from 2:30-3:30 PM, Film Studies I: Design led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

The trilogy of Film Studies seminars explores what becomes “invisible” when viewers lose themselves within a film’s “illusion of realism.” In Design, we begin with mise en scene, i.e. everything put in front of the camera: costumes/ makeup/ hair, props, blocking, acting, lighting, and framing. We will watch clips from a wide variety of films including Breakfast at Tiffany’s, The Silence of the Lambs, Pride and Prejudice, Network, Dr. Strangelove, and Road to Perdition. Students will also use their phones or digital cameras to make short films demonstrating their understanding of the techniques we discuss.

Session Two

July 6-July 24 (3-week session)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Detective Stories: Edgar Allan Poe & Sir Arthur Conan Doyle Second Session led by John Campbell (English Dept.)

Once again, in this seminar, we’re going to look back to the supposed origins of the detective story in English and read several short stories about Edgar Allan Poe’s Inspector Dupin. From there, we’ll move on to one of the classic Sherlock Holmes novellas by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The class will consist of a vigorous discussion of each case, its detective’s methods, and, of course, the detective story as a form.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Creative Writing: Flash Fiction led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

In this seminar, we will examine the short story form in miniature through the abbreviated genres of sudden, flash, and micro-fiction, exploring standard as well as atypical narratives including literature of place and othering of self. Possible authors include Tom Wolfe, Krishnan Varma, Anne Beattie, David Leavitt, Langston Hughes, and Molly Giles. Students will read and write daily, concluding with a portfolio of original work.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Advanced Research Skills led by Kate Covintree (US Librarian)

Perhaps it has been a while since you've had to use the library databases. If that's the case, this workshop is for you. We will look beyond the sources cited at the bottom of encyclopedia articles and learn more about finding scholarly and primary sources that can be incorporated into academic essays. You will need a computer with internet access, a wheelergmail account, and a Wheeler lunch number.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Homer’s Odyssey Continued with John Campbell (English Dept.)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Physics of the Large Hadron Collider, led by Tammy Kjonaas (Science Dept.)

We will discuss the history and goals of the world’s largest science experiment, the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, Switzerland. Students will learn some basics of particle physics and will analyze real data from the Compact Muon Solenoid. No prior physics experience required. (Repeat of June session)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 1:00-2:00 PM, Electrochemistry led by Christine Perkins (Science Dept.)

When atoms gain and lose electrons, powerful reactions are happening! Come learn about oxidation and reduction, voltaic and electrolytic cells, half-reactions, and electrochemical technology. For current 10th, 11th or 12th grade students.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00-11:00 AM, Film Studies II: Cinematography led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

In this sequel to Film Studies I: Design, we will examine the camera choices which determine the relationship between the frame and what’s being filmed. We will begin with implied proxemics and then explore deep space composition, camera angle and height, stationary and traveling camera movement, and lens movement. We will watch clips from a wide variety of films including Citizen Kane, Jurassic Park, Notorious, Do the Right Thing, Inception, Touch of Evil, Children of Men, Goodfellas, Vertigo, and The Bourne Identity. Students will also use their phones or digital cameras to make short films demonstrating their understanding of the techniques we discuss. NOTE: This seminar is designed to follow Film Studies I: Design but can be taken independently.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:00 -11:00 AM, Graphic Nonfiction led by Kate Covintree (US Librarian)

How can a graphic adaptation of facts help us understand a situation? In this workshop, we will learn about the skills needed to read graphic texts and read graphic non-fiction to learn about real events. We may also try our hand at creating our own graphic nonfiction piece. Please have one or two graphic nonfiction books on hand to start. (Repeat of June session)

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Maintaining Motivation led by Annie White (Academic Support)

In a small group, you will set personal goals, explore how to maintain them, ward off procrastination, develop intentional happiness skills, hold each other accountable, and much more.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Science in Hollywood: Science Fact or Science Fiction? led by Marc Harrison (Science Dept.)

We'll examine Hollywood movies and television shows in order to discuss what is possible, what is probable, what is real, and what's not possible (now or in the future) from the realm of science fiction. Also, we’ll explore some of the ethical questions that these films and series raise. Ready to jump in at warp speed? Engage!

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 1:00-2:00 PM, Science of Music and Sound led by Christine Perkins (Science Dept.)

This seminar will examine the nature of sound and the physics and mathematics of music. You will receive an introduction to wave mechanics and then use your knowledge of waves to begin understanding the physics that underlie such musical principles as timbre, volume, harmony, intonation, and scales. With a hands-on component, please be prepared to find materials around your house to make homemade instruments. (Repeat of June session)

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:30-3:30 PM, Improvisational Comedy: Part One led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

Love watching reruns of Whose Line Is It Anyway? Curious how the casts of Bridesmaids, Waiting for Guffman, and Anchorman learned their craft? Then join in and learn how to play Four Square, Buzz, Props, Mr. & Ms. Fortune, and other classics. No experience necessary, but do bring a willingness to laugh at yourself and others. Especially others.

Session Three

August 3-August 14 (2-week sessions)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM, Creative Writing: Playwriting led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

Students will work individually and collaboratively on exercises exploring character, conflict, dialogue, subtext, and action, as well as theatrical spectacle and production. We will experiment with fiction and memoir, realism and fantasy, and after peer editing and workshopping, the seminar will culminate in the composition of original one act plays. The seminar is open to those with and without a background in the theatre.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 10:30 AM-11:30 AM, Improvisational Comedy: Part Deux led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

Having mastered the basics of improv last month, we’ll focus on more advanced games like Party Quirks, Messages, Dating Game, Scene Beyond, and Café Celêbre. No experience necessary, but comfort with self-mockery is recommended. NOTE: This seminar is designed to follow Improvisational Comedy: Part One but can be taken independently.

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:30-3:30 PM, Film Studies III: Editing and Stop Motion Animation led by Michael Himelfarb (English Dept.)

In this final chapter of the Film Studies trilogy, we will explore how individual shots are combined and coordinated into a cinematic whole. Together we will examine pace, invisible vs discontinuous editing, montage, parallel editing, jump and match cuts, and optical punctuation, as well as speed/ length of shot, focusing on stop motion animation. We watch clips from a wide variety of films including The Social Network, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Citizen Kane, Rocky, Rushmore, The Matrix Reloaded, The Godfather, Fantastic Mr. Fox, and Kubo and the Two Strings. Students will also use their phones or digital cameras to make short films demonstrating their understanding of the techniques we discuss. NOTE: this seminar is designed to follow Film Studies I: Design and II: Cinematography but can be taken independently.

August 10-August 21 (2-week sessions)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, Training for a Tri led by Kristin Murphy (Athletics Dept. Varsity Swim Team Coach)

If you’ve ever been interested in triathlons, open water swimming, biking or running, join us! We will be discussing training programs, nutrition for athletes, the benefits of cross-training, and culminating with a virtual race. All levels welcome.

Mondays & Wednesdays, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM, Visual Journaling led by Kristin Murphy (Art Dept.)

This seminar will provide daily doses of inspiration from contemporary artists, art history, current events, public art in our community, and more. Students will develop a visual journaling daily practice and an understanding of the ways in which artistic expression can help you process events and experiences in your life.

August 3-August 21 (3-week sessions)

Mondays & Wednesdays, 10:00 AM-11:00 AM, Her Discography led by Reina Thomas (History Dept.)

This course is part of the #sayhername history elective and during this seminar we will examine the experiences of black women in the US through media, specifically music. The major skill we will focus upon is the close reading of a text (song lyrics) and thinking about how music can be used as a primary and secondary source of knowledge. (Repeat of June session)

Tuesdays & Thursdays, 11:00 AM -12:00 PM, Chemistry Jump-Start led by Christine Perkins (Science Dept.)

This seminar is offered to current 9th-grade students entering regular Chemistry to prepare the skills needed in the 2020-2021 school year. It will give students a preview of the algebra used, as well as an introduction to the periodic table and some basic chemical reactions.

Science in Hollywood: Science Fact or Science Fiction? led by Marc Harrison (Science Dept.) could run again based on student interest.

To enroll in Upper School S-Term: Click Here

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