Shakespeare's Childhood McKenna Tyler period 4

Top Right: Shakespeare's home Top Left: Latin root words Bottom: Globe Theater

Thesis: Shakespeare had a very interesting childhood, this can be shown through his life around writing poems , early years , and later.

Writing:

Shakespeare's Beginning, Early Life of Childhood

Quote #1: "Beginning at about the age of 7, William probably attended the Stratford grammar school with other boys of his social class. The school’s highly qualified teachers were graduates of Oxford University. Students spent about nine hours a day in school. They attended classes the year around, except for three brief holiday periods. Knowledge of Latin was necessary for a career in medicine, law, or the church. In addition, the ability to read Latin was considered a sign of an educated person."

Commentary: When William was young he attended a grammar school. There was a lot of smart boys and girls and teachers. William was at such a young age and was able to read Latin. That was amazing! Back then if u were able to read Latin you could gotten a really difficult career in the business.

Quote #2: "The Shakespeares were a family of considerable local prominence. In 1565, John Shakespeare became an alderman.Three years later, he was elected bailiff (mayor), the highest civic honor that a Stratford resident could receive. Later, he held several other civic posts. But toward the end of his life, John Shakespeare had financial problems."

Commentary: Williams father had many problems. John Shakespeare was a alderman when William was just born. A few years later ha became a mayor but following a fer years into that he saw himself facing many many financial problems.

Quote #3: "William Shakespeare was born in the small market town of Stratford-upon-Avon in 1564, the third of eight children.The register of Holy Trinity, the parish church in Stratford, records his baptism on April 26. According to the custom at that time, infants were baptized about three days after their birth. Therefore, the generally accepted date for Shakespeare’s birth is April 23."

Commentary: William was born in a poor area with not a lot of people in the town. He was the third child out of eight. He was the middle child so he may have gotten in a lot of arguments with his brothers and sisters. With some of the conflict he had with some of his siblings he was the most bright of all.

Quote #4: "As a market center, Stratford was a lively town. In addition, holidays provided popular pageants and shows, including plays about the legendary outlaw Robin Hood and his merry men. By 1569, traveling companies of professional actors were performing in Stratford. Stratford also held two large fairs each year, which attracted numerous visitors from other counties. For young Shakespeare, Stratford could thus have been an exciting place to live."

Commentary: Even though the town was small, there were many things to be done in the town. On Williams spare time he liked to go to plays and pageants. The town would throw 2 huge fairs or types of events every year. So william was very happy to be living in this town where we could have fun with close friends and family.

Shakespeare's Later Years

Quote #5: "In 1594 Shakespeare became an actor and playwright for the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the company that later became the King's Men under James I. Until the end of his London career Shakespeare remained with the company; it is thought that as an actor he played old men's roles, such as the ghost in Hamlet and Old Adam in As You Like It. In 1596 he obtained a coat of arms, and by 1597 he was prosperous enough to buy New Place in Stratford, which later was the home of his retirement years. In 1599 he became a partner in the ownership of the Globe theatre, and in 1608 he was part owner of the Blackfriars theatre. Shakespeare retired and returned to Stratford c.1613. He undoubtedly enjoyed a comfortable living throughout his career and in retirement, although he was never a wealthy man."

Commentary: He became an actor and while he was acting he would usualy play the part of older men. He played the ghost in Hamlet and Old Adam in As You Like It. Later he became a worker at the Globe theater and then became a part time owner at another theater called Blackfriars theater. He later retired and returned to his town Stratford and quite enjoyed and would miss the fun living time he had at his old job acting and spending time at the two theaters.

Quote #6: "In 1594 Shakespeare became an actor and playwright for the Lord Chamberlain's Men, the company that later became the King's Men under James I. Until the end of his London career Shakespeare remained with the company; it is thought that as an actor he played old men's roles, such as the ghost in Hamlet and Old Adam in As You Like It. In 1596 he obtained a coat of arms, and by 1597 he was prosperous enough to buy New Place in Stratford, which later was the home of his retirement years. In 1599 he became a partner in the ownership of the Globe theatre, and in 1608 he was part owner of the Blackfriars theatre. Shakespeare retired and returned to Stratford c.1613. He undoubtedly enjoyed a comfortable living throughout his career and in retirement, although he was never a wealthy man."

Commentary: He became an actor and while he was acting he would usualy play the part of older men. He played the ghost in Hamlet and Old Adam in As You Like It. Later he became a worker at the Globe theater and then became a part time owner at another theater called Blackfriars theater. He later retired and returned to his town Stratford and quite enjoyed and would miss the fun living time he had at his old job acting and spending time at the two theaters.

Shakespeare Writing Poems

Quote #7: "The play is especially moving and powerful because it seems to represent Shakespeare wrestling with his own bitterness and anger, as he does in Timon of Athens – but there he fails to achieve closure. The world he puts on stage in The Tempest is, if anything, more dismaying than Timon’s: scheming and murderous courtiers, faithless brothers, a hopelessly sozzled butler, a witless jester, a runtish monster – a “freckled whelp hag-born”, as Prospero viciously describes him, “not honour’d with/A human shape”. Apart from one honest courtier, old Gonzalo, all Prospero’s hopes for humanity repose in his daughter, Miranda, and his usurping brother’s son, Ferdinand. Their goodness, united in marriage, will somehow offer hope for the future. Shakespeare only just manages to make these paragons human, living creatures, but he achieves it in the end."

Commentary: Shakespeare's plays are a very powerful and they have a lot to do with his real life. The play Timon of Athens is a example if it relating to his kids and family members, but at the end dog each play he ends up making everything okay or gets it great.

Quote #8: "In 1599, Burbage's theater was torn down and its timbers were used by shakespeare and his company to build the Globe Theater. This was the theater for which Shakespeare wrote most of his plays. In the play Henry V William called his theater a "wooden O". It was a large, round building with a large platform stage the projected from one end into a yard open to the sky."

Commentary: In the Globe theater lots and lots of plays were produced and shown in this theater. In fact the building is still there in London where tourists go and take tours and ect. around the building. The Globe Theater did a lot of great things to Shakespeare and hopefully it will bring more joy to other writers as well.

Quote #9: "Shakespeare's plots, language, and characters were too complex, too obscure, too contradictory, and too digressive. Essentially, McWhorter's argument has always been current -- whereas readers have time to reflect and editors to which they can turn for explanations, audiences encountering Shakespeare unmediated will inevitably lose their way, and, with it, the meaning and pleasure of the plays. And directors have always sought to facilitate clarity by simplifying the texts, cutting or substituting for archaisms, unifying characters, resolving ambiguous relationships, and adapting plots so that their generic outcomes might better fit their premises. Though English and American directors have not typically produced translated texts, they've valued -- perhaps overvalued -- the goals of the translators."

Commentary: Many people had a hard time trying to understand what Shakespeare was saying in his plays and his writing. The directors were feeling nervous about what if the crowd didn't understand what Shakespeare was trying to get across to them. With the directors being worried about if the crowd would be confused or not, they hired translators to translate what Shakespeare was saying or what the actors were performing.

Quote #10: "As the name of these acting companies indicate, theatrical groups depend on the support of a wealthy patron-the King's Men were supported by King James himself.Shakespeare worked with this company for the rest of his writing life. He was the ultimate professional writer. Soon he made the play Romeo and Juliet between 1594 and 1596. Then by 1612, that was around the time where he retired and retired a happy man."

Commentary:Living a really good writing life, Shakespeare wanted to retire after making his amazing play, Romeo and Juliet. Shakespeare plays are still very popular now and days almost as popular as they were back-then.

Credits:

Created with images by ell brown - "Mary Arden's House / Farm - Wilmcote - Palmer's Farmhouse - Dovecote" • ell brown - "Mary Arden's House / Farm - Wilmcote - Palmer's Farmhouse" • USM MS photos - "IMG_0895" • Kieran Lynam - "Shakespeare's Globe"

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