Exposure Lab Week #1 // Day #2

Today in class you will be going outside with your cameras to capture a series of images in differing situations. The purpose of this is three fold:

First, to get you in the mind set of shooting with a purpose. When you pick up the camera or any creative tool you should always start with a purpose so that you can begin to filter the stimuli around you. This will make subject selection easier in the same way that you tend to notice things that you are thinking about or interact with more often. Example: I just in the last year began riding a road bike to work. Since that is such an important part of my day I have noticed that I am much more conscious of other cyclists, bikes, and than I was two years ago. There have always been cyclists and bike shops before, what changed was my interest level.

Second, is to have you start to learn the fine controls of your camera. Can you set your exposure manually? How do I focus on subjects specifically? What happens when I shoot in different environments? What can I not control? Often Knowing what your limitations are is what leads to your first steps to creative and fulfilling work. The old saying "necessity is the mother of invention” rings true in this case. As you explore do not fear the failure of your tools, instead push them to the limits of their utility when possible. In order to do this you will need to understand and carefully observe successful images and unsuccessful images.

Third, I want you to start observing light. This is the essence of the photographic mediums. Observing and capturing good, interesting, and descriptive light is where success with a camera is lies. You can be technically perfect with the most interesting subjects, but if the light illuminating your images does not bring the correct quality to your frame, your viewing audience may never stop long enough to enjoy your work. Interesting light trumps all else and tends to filter to best images from the mediocre.

General Instructions:

You will have an hour to walk around with your cameras. There is no limit to where you can shoot as ling as you make it back to the computer lab in an hour with all of your shots. For this assignment you will not be allowed to use previously captured images because this is about you gaining experience with the situations and your camera. Older images are experience in the bank and your accumulated growth has already been logged. We will finish class in the lab with you all downloading your images with the Adobe Downloader and ultimately uploading your images to google drive.

Here is the list of images that you need to capture today. In total you will turn in 20 images for this assignment but you can shoot as many frames as it takes for you to get what you desire. I will be grading you on the overall lighting (exposure), Focus (how sharp the subject is), and attention paid in the frame (are you leaving distracting elements that draw away from your subject in the frame).

Front Lit

Light Source is behind the photographer and is striking the subject directly, creating full illumination.

Back Lit

The light source is behind the subject casting a shadow over the subject. This at times causes silhouetting.

Triangle

In our man made world there are many cases where we can create different geometric shapes by just observing the structures and environment around us. Search out and create a triangle either by observation or composition.

Subject with a Sky

Compose a subject so that the sky is the backdrop of the image.

Image without the Sky as Background

Adjust your angle to subtract the sky from your background.

Image at 2 Feet

Find a subject that you can capture from 2 feet away - 10 feet away - and 50 Feet away. Observe the difference in the dominance of the subject from frame to frame. Keep the subject the same in each image.

Subject at 10 Feet

Find a subject that you can capture from 2 feet away - 10 feet away - and 50 Feet away. Observe the difference in the dominance of the subject from frame to frame. Keep the subject the same in each image.

Subject at 50 Feet

Find a subject that you can capture from 2 feet away - 10 feet away - and 50 Feet away. Observe the difference in the dominance of the subject from frame to frame. Keep the subject the same in each image.

Subject in Motion

Choose a subject that is in motion and capture it in a way that accentuates the motion in some way.

Capture a Detail

Capture a detail of a larger object.

Bold Color

Choose a subject that has a bold color that is the subject of the image.

Dogs Eye View

The perspective that an image is taken from effects the message and perception of that subject. Getting on level with a subject creates importance for the subject bringing the attention to the subject primarily.

Human Eye View

Images that are shot from a persons normal perspective require a concerted effort to balance the subject with the background. From this perspective be careful of dividing the frame equally and thus dividing the viewers attention.

Birds Eye View

The birds eye view flattens perspective and creates pattern of the ordinary.

Artificial Light

Artificial Light

Minimum Zoom

Maximum Zoom

Label the photos specific to the assigned images from the above list.

Upload your images to a folder on Box labeled “Lab 1- Exposures” inside the folder that you shared with me before. (example: "Folder with your name" > Lab 1 - Exposures) before the next class..

Created By
Bill Carrigan
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Credits:

Bill Carrigan 2016

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