The Renaissance By: MISS Bretado

Marco Polo and the Silk Road

RACES: The reopening of the Silk Road helped spark the Renaissance. Trade increased between Europe and Asia after people grew curious about Marco Polo's travels. "People began to demand goods from Asia" (Holt 300). Since people demanded more goods from Asia, Italian and other European merchants became more involved in trade. The reopening of the Silk Road helped spark the Renaissance because trade and contact increased between different people from different lands.

An artists' depiction of Marco Polo.
Left: Marco Polo recounts his travels. Right: Marco Polo originated from Venice, an island city.

Italian Trade Cities - Florence

Medici Family

Top Left: The Medici's commissioned artists to paint their palace with wonderful art. Bottom left: An artists depiction of the Medici family, with Cosimo de' Medici at center. Right: A chapel who's architecture was commissioned by the Medici's.

Rediscovering the Past - Greek and Roman

RACES: Greek and Roman classical ideas helped shape the development of the Renaissance. Because Greek and Roman classical ideas focused on the study of the humanities, a new philosophy, humanism, was born. "Humanists believed in the worth and potential of all individuals" (Document 1). Since humanists focused on the worth and potential of all individuals and the humanities focused on "the actions and abilities of humans" (Document 1), Renaissance thinkers were influenced dramatically. These thinkers would eventually develop great interest in the arts, sciences, and learning which led the Renaissance to spread even more. The rediscovery of classical ideas from Greece and Rome sparked interest in humanism, therefore helping shape the development of the Renaissance.

A Greek statue showcasing all of the characteristics of classic art: realistic, showing movement, and showcasing the human form.

A piece of Roman art.

Greek vase also demonstrating the focus on the human form.

An artists depiction of Plato, one of the most famous classical writers.

Plato and Aristotle.

A Roman statue of Augustus Cesar showcasing the amount of detail put in to realistic sculptures.

A statue of Thucydides, a famous classical writer.

Leonardo DaVinci

This article deals with Da Vinci's focus on anatomy and the human body. Da Vinci was devoted to learning about how the human body worked and how the body looked inside. He sketched out organs, bones, muscles, ligaments, and veins. Through his research he learned about how different organs worked, such as the heart. He also applied what he learned to his artwork, making it even more realistic.

Far left: DaVinci's sketch of the human spine and how it is connected to the brain. Left: A sketch of the organs inside of the human body. Right: A sketch of the different ventricles of the heart. Far right: A sketch of the classic Vitruvian Man, an analysis of human body proportion.

Michelangelo

This video focuses on Michelangelo's contributions to the art world during the Renaissance.

Paper and Printing - Johann Gutenburg

Renaissance Writing - William Shakespeare

Credits:

Created with images by meritxell-anfitrite - "Los viajes de Marco Polo" • meritxell-anfitrite - "Los viajes de Marco Polo" • meritxell-anfitrite - "Los viajes de Marco Polo" • Abode of Chaos - "Anatomie du corps humain selon Da Vinci DDC_9736" • Abode of Chaos - "Anatomie du corps humain selon Da Vinci DDC_9536" • Abode of Chaos - "Anatomie du corps humain selon Da Vinci DDC_9481" • Abode of Chaos - "L'Homme de Vitruve, Ecce Homo P1050060"

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