Julius Caesar Assassination 100 BC - 44 BC

What was the reason for the assassination?

Julius Caesar´s assassination baffled many people in this day and age. Everyone loved him and were astonished at this horrible act committed. The main conspirators behind this wrong doing were Gaius Cassius Longinus, Decimus Junius Brutus, and Marcus Junius Brutus. The main question was why? Why would so called ¨acquaintances¨ of the great Julius Caesar stab him in the back? Caesar posed as a threat to all of the senate. He wanted total control and dictatorial authority over the Roman empire. No one was bound to let that happen. They all felt as if the work they were putting in would not mean anything unless Caesar was gone.

What were the consequences for the conspirators?

There were many different consequences for each conspirator but ultimately this assassination led to chaos. The Liberators' civil war was started by the Second Triumvirate to avenge Julius Caesar's murder took place. The war was fought by the forces of Mark Antony and Octavian against the forces of Caesar's assassins Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. The result of the war was the killing of Brutus and Longinus and the Second Triumvirate victory. There were no consequences towards a specific person but revenge was taken. Brutus and his conspirators never reigned over the Roman empire and their plan backfired immediately after Caesar´s death. (Gadke, Simon. "The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination." Maclean's, 16 Mar. 2015, p. 57. World History in Context, Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.)

Who handed Julius Caesar the warning note?

Caesar had been very stubborn the morning of his death. He had a dream of being murdered, but ignored it. His wife had an animal killed to make sure the dream of Caesar´s murder would not play out. The animal had no heart, which is a very bad omen that Caesar ignored as well. One last sign Caesar got which he also ignored was a letter. This letter consisted of all the conspirators and their plot to kill Caesar. Artemidorus waited on a street near the capitol to hand Caesar the note. Little did he know that note could of saved his life. The note was never even opened. Maybe things would have went differently if Caesar was a little opened minded that morning.

Citations - (Gadke, Simon. "The Death of Caesar: The Story of History's Most Famous Assassination." Maclean's, 16 Mar. 2015, p. 57. World History in Context, Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.) (Sizgorich, Tom. "Julius Caesar." World History: Ancient and Medieval Eras. ABC-CLIO, 2004. Web. 7 Mar. 2017.)

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Created with images by Stifts- och landsbiblioteket i Skara - "Iulius Cæsar" • Steppinstars - "colosseum roman italy" • wwarby - "Julius Caesar" • MiiiSH - "untitled image"

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