Sweden Sophia luetticke

This is Sweden flag. Sweden adopted it on June 22, 1906.

In Sweden Football is the most popular sport. In Sweden they call soccer football. They do this because, Soccer is officially called association football, which is one type of football code in the world today. “Soccer” was a slang term used by the British to distinguish association football from rugby football, another football code, that had the slang name “rugger.”

This is the Drottningholm Palace is the private residence of the Swedish royal family. t is one of Sweden's Royal Palaces. It was originally built in the late 16th century. King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia live there now

This Vasa ship capsized and sank in Stockholm 1628. After 333 years on the sea bed the mighty warship was salvaged and the voyage could continue. Today Vasa is the world's only preserved 17th century ship and the most visited museum in Scandinavia.

Skansen is the world's first open-air museum, founded in 1891. Here you can stroll through five centuries of Swedish history, from north to south, with a real sense of the past all around in the histori­cal buildings and dwellings, peop­led by characters in period dress. This was Hazelius's intention, right from the start, to concentrate on showing the Scandinavian fauna even though a number of exotic animals from elsewhere were admitted to Skansen. This is still the case today. As a zoo, Skansen is primarily committed to showing Scandinavian animals. Some 75 different species and breeds of Scandinavian animals are represented at Skansen – more than anywhere else.

This is the Sofiero palace. Sofiero Castle or just Sofiero was one of the Swedish royal family's country mansions. It was originally a Scanian farm called Skabelycke, bought in 1864 by Crown Prince Oscar of Sweden and his wife Sophia of Nassau.

Sweden is located in the the North, East part of Europe. Its capital is Stockholm. It's neighboring countries are Norway and Finland The Ocean that is by the coastal part of Sweden is the Atlantic.

As early as in 1812, prior to the Napoleonic invasion of Russia, the Swedish Crown Prince Charles John had entered into an agreement with Tsar Alexander 1 that Russia would support a Swedish attack on Norway in order to force Denmark-Norway to cede its northern part to Sweden. The Swedish attack against Norway was rejected, however, and Swedish forces were instead directed against France in Central Europe. The Swedish troops were deployed against Napoleon's forces as a result of agreements between Charles John and diplomats from the United Kingdom and Prussia, which indicated that Norway would be ceded to Sweden after France and its allies (which included Denmark-Norway) were defeated.

This song is called "Must Have Been Love", By Image result for who wrote must have been love by Pre Gessle. Performed by Roxette the most famous singer in Sweden. Sweden has had a long, beautiful relationship with pop music. In the 70s there was ABBA, in the 80s there was Roxette, and in the 90s there was Ace of Base and The Cardigans. In the past decades, things have gotten even more interesting in Sweden and the surrounding countries. Scandinavia has became a hotbed for forward-thinking music steeped in pop sensibility and experimental tendencies. While electronic, metal, rock, and hip-hop have all thrived in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark, there is still something about pop. When it comes to pop music, it seems that Scandinavia can do no wrong.

This is a song sang by the second most popular group "Little Dragon". Little Dragon are a Swedish electronic music band from Gothenburg, formed in 1996. The band consists of Yukimi Nagano (vocals, percussion), Erik Bodin (drums), Fredrik Källgren Wallin (bass) and Håkan Wirenstrand (keyboards). Little Dragon's first release was the double A-side 7" single "Twice"/"Test", released on the Off the Wall label in 2006. The following year, the band signed with the larger British independent label Peacefrog Records and released their eponymous debut album in August 2007. Their second album, Machine Dreams, was released in August 2009, and gathered favourable reviews. The third album, Ritual Union, was released in July 2011 and was ranked at number forty-one on Rolling Stone list of the 50 Best Albums of 2011. Clash placed it at number thirty-one on its list of The Top 40 Albums of 2011. The band's fourth studio album, Nabuma Rubberband, was released in May 2014 by Because Music and was met with critical acclaim. It received a nomination for Best Dance/Electronic Album at the 57th Annual Grammy Awards.

Lutheran Christianity is officially the largest religion in Sweden, with 6.2 million Swedish citizens being members of the Church of Sweden. The high membership figure is mainly due to the fact that until 1996 all newborn children with at least one parent being a member of the church were also made members. Other Christian Churches include the Catholic Church and the Eastern Orthodox Church. Islam is the second largest religion in Sweden, practiced by 5% of the population. The rest of the population are either irreligious or members of other religious groups.

Britt Ekland (born Britt-Marie Eklund; 6 October 1942) is a Swedish film, stage, and television actress, and singer. She appeared in numerous films in her heyday throughout the 1960s and 1970s, including critically acclaimed roles in William Friedkin's The Night They Raided Minsky's (1968), and the British crime film Get Carter (1971). Ekland was born Britt-Marie Eklund in Stockholm, Sweden to Maj Britt, a secretary, and Sven Axel Eklund, who ran an upscale clothing store in Stockholm and was captain of the Swedish national curling team. Ekland's mother died of Alzheimer's disease in the 1980s, which had a profound effect on her. Ekland grew up with three younger brothers, and has said that she was overweight for much of her childhood: "I was very heavy.

Malin Maria Åkerman was born on May 12, 1978. Malin Maria Åkerman is a Swedish Canadian actress, model and singer. She became known for making appearances in several Canadian productions. In the early 2000s, she had many television and film parts, including The Utopian Society (2003) and Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (2004). Following a supporting role on the comedy series The Comeback (2005), Åkerman gained her first starring roles in the feature films The Heartbreak Kid (2007) and 27 Dresses (2008).

Peter Mattias "Foppa" Forsberg was born on July 22, 1973. is a Swedish retired professional ice hockey player and the current assistant general manager of Modo Hockey. Known for his on-ice vision and physical play, Forsberg is considered one of the greatest players of his generation.[1] Although his career was shortened by persistent injuries, as of 2014, he stands eighth all-time in career points-per-game and fourth all-time in career assists-per-game[3] in the NHL, only behind Wayne Gretzky, Mario Lemieux and Bobby Orr. His 19-year professional career includes 13 years in the National Hockey League (NHL), where he won two Stanley Cups with the Colorado Avalanche, as well as several individual honors including the Hart Memorial Trophy in 2003. As of the end of the 2013–14 season, he is the fourth-highest all-time Swedish point scorer in the NHL regular season. Before his short-lived comeback season in 2011, Forsberg never had a negative plus-minus rating, giving him an overall career rating of +238.

Göran Bror Benny Andersson was born 16 December 1946. Göran Bror Benny Andersson is a Swedish musician, composer, member of the Swedish music group ABBA (1972–1982), and co-composer of the musicals Chess, Kristina från Duvemåla, and Mamma Mia!. For the 2008 film version of Mamma Mia!, he worked also as an executive producer. Since 2001, he is active with his own band Benny Anderssons orkester. Göran Bror Benny Andersson was born in Vällingby to 34-year-old civil engineer Gösta Andersson and his 26-year-old wife Laila. His sister Eva-Lis Andersson followed in 1948. Andersson's musical background comes from his father and grandfather; they both enjoyed playing the accordion, and at six, Benny got his own. Father Gösta and grandfather Efraim taught him Swedish folk music, traditional music, and the odd schlager.

The Prime Minister (Swedish: statsminister, literally "Minister of the State") is the head of government in Sweden. Before the creation of the office of a Prime Minister in 1876, Sweden did not have a head of government separate from its head of state, namely the King, in whom the executive authority was vested. Louis Gerhard De Geer, the architect behind the new bicameral Riksdag of 1866 that replaced the centuries-old Riksdag of the Estates, became the first officeholder in 1876. The current Prime Minister of Sweden is Stefan Löfven, leader of the Swedish Social Democratic Party.

This are some of the kings and queens of swedens past. The earliest record of what is generally considered to be a Swedish king appears in Tacitus' work Germania, c. 100 AD (the king of the Suiones). However, due to scant and unreliable sources before the 11th century, lists of succession traditionally start in the 10th century with king Olof Skötkonung, and his father Eric the Victorious, who also were the first Swedish kings to be baptized. There are, however, lists of Swedish pagan monarchs with far older dates, but in many cases these kings appear in sources of disputed historical reliability. These records notably deal with the legendary House of Yngling, and based on the Danish chronicler Saxo Grammaticus, Eric the Victorious and Olof Skötkonung have often been classified as belonging to the Swedish house of Ynglings, tracing them back to Sigurd Ring and Ragnar Lodbrok (whom Saxo considered to belong to the House of Yngling). However, according to Icelandic sources this line of kings was broken (see Ingjald and Ivar Vidfamne). As there is no evidence that Eric and Olof ever used the Yngling name themselves, modern historians instead refer to their family as the House of Munsö, the Old Dynasty or the House of Uppsala. Sweden has been ruled by queens regnant on three separate occasions: by Margaret (1389–1412), Christina (1632–1654) and Ulrika Eleonora (1718–1720) respectively.

During the 11th and 12th centuries, Sweden gradually became a unified Christian kingdom that later included what is today Finland. During the early Middle Ages, the Swedish state also expanded to control Norrland and Finland. Modern Sweden started out of the Kalmar Union formed in 1397 and by the unification of the country by King Gustav Vasa in the 16th century. Vasa fought for an independent Sweden and broke with the papacy, establishing the Lutheran Church in Sweden. In the 17th century Sweden expanded its territories to form the Swedish empire. Most of these conquered territories had to be given up during the 18th century. Sweden joined in the Enlightenment culture of the day in the arts, architecture, science and learning. Between 1570 and 1800 Sweden experienced two periods of urban expansion. Finland was lost to Russia in a war in 1808-1809.

The assassination of Olof Palme (Swedish: Palmemordet) occurred when on Olof Palme, Prime Minister of Sweden, was assassinated on Friday 28 February 1986 in Stockholm, Sweden, at 23:21 hours Central European Time (22:21 UTC). Palme was fatally wounded by a single gunshot while walking home from a cinema with his wife Lisbet Palme on the central Stockholm street Sveavägen. Mrs Palme was slightly wounded by a second shot. The couple did not have bodyguards at the time.

Camilla Läckberg is now working on the ninth story in her series of crime novels set in her home town of Fjällbacka on the west coast of Sweden. Writer Erica Falck and detective Patrik Hedström are at the centre of the action. Together they solve murders linked to the history of the small fishing community. Camilla Läckberg writes crime novels with a filmic quality; they are a perfect blend of everyday life and excitement, which has brought her millions of readers all over the world. The Ice Princess (2003): Almost 2.6 million copies of Camilla’s debut novel have been sold on the international market. The story begins with the discovery of the dead body of a woman in a bath. But who murdered her, and why? The Tanumshede police begin their investigation, and Erica Falck is drawn into the case, which touches her personally.

Alexander Skarsgård was born on August 25, 1976 in Stockholm. Sweden may not have a large population but it has gifted the world with bounty of astonishing directors and actors. Greta Garbo, Ingmar Bergman, Max von Sydow and Ingrid Bergman are just the tip of the iceberg of Nordic actors and filmmakers who have enchanted and engaged cinemaphiles across the globe: Alexander Johan Hjalmar Skarsgård is poised to join their ranks. As the eldest son of famed actor Stellan Skarsgård, the handsome actor/director comes by his talent honestly; however, Alexander did not grow up in the glitzy world of international cinema. Alexander was a bit of a rebel as a teen and, instead of continuing college, at the age of nineteen, he entered compulsory military service (military conscription). He used the time to contemplate his future. He studied at the Leeds Metropolitan University then moved to New York where he enrolled at Marymount Manhattan College to study theatre.

Ann-Margret was born on April 28, 1941. Ann-Margret is a Swedish-American actress, singer, and dancer. As an actress, she is best known for her roles in Bye Bye Birdie (1963), Viva Las Vegas (1964), The Cincinnati Kid (1965), Carnal Knowledge (1971), Tommy (1975), Grumpy Old Men (1993), and Grumpier Old Men (1995). She has won five Golden Globe Awards and been nominated for two Academy Awards, two Grammy Awards, a Screen Actors Guild Award, and six Emmy Awards. In 2010, she won her first Emmy Award for her guest appearance on Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. Her singing and acting careers span five decades, starting in 1961; initially, she was billed as a female version of Elvis Presley. She had a minor hit in 1961 and a charting album in 1964, and scored a disco hit in 1979. In 2001, she recorded a critically acclaimed gospel album, and an album of Christmas songs from 2004 continues to be available.

Greta Garbo was born on September 18, 1905 and died on 15 of April 1990. Greta Garbo was a Swedish-born American film actress during the 1920s and 1930s. Garbo was nominated three times for the Academy Award for Best Actress and received an honorary one in 1954 for her "luminous and unforgettable screen performances." In 1999, the American Film Institute ranked Garbo fifth on their list of the greatest female stars of Classic Hollywood Cinema, after Katharine Hepburn, Bette Davis, Audrey Hepburn, and Ingrid Bergman.

Ingrid Bergman was born in Stockholm, Sweden on August 29, 1915. Her mother, Friedel Adler Bergman, a Hamburg, Germany native, died when Ingrid was just three years old. Ingrid's father, Justus Samuel Bergman, a Swede, raised Ingrid until his death, when she was 12. Justus, who owned a photography shop, encouraged Ingrid's artistic pursuits and even caught some scenes of her as a small child with a motion picture camera. Many years later, the famous director Ingmar Bergman (no relation), with whom Ingrid worked, compiled and edited these home movies. After her father's death, Ingrid was left to the care of an unmarried aunt, who died within months, and she eventually spent her teenage years with an uncle and his family. As a teenager, Ingrid appeared as a film extra, in addition to acting in productions at the private school she attended. After graduating in 1933, she attended the Royal Dramatic Theater School in Stockholm for a year, during which time she made her professional stage debut. Her first speaking role in a film came in Swedish director Gustaf Molander's "Munkbrogreven" in 1935, in which she played the maid of a hotel that sold illegal liquor.

Just like ketchup and mustard, lingonberry jam is widely used to accompany a variety of dishes, from meatballs and pancakes to porridge and black pudding. But despite its sweetness, it is rarely used on bread. Thanks to the Right of Public Access (Allemansrätten), which gives everyone the freedom to roam and enjoy nature, many Swedes grow up picking lingonberries in the forest, and using these tiny tart red fruits to make a jam-like preserve.

You might swap meatballs for mini sausages or pick cured salmon (gravad lax) rather than smoked, but your smorgasbord wouldn’t be complete without pickled herring (sill). This fishy favourite remains the basis of every typical Swedish buffet. With an abundance of herring in both the North and Baltic Seas, Swedes have been pickling since the Middle Ages, mainly as a way of preserving the fish for storage and transportation. Pickled herring comes in a variety of flavours – mustard, onion, garlic and dill, to name a few – and is often eaten with boiled potatoes, sour cream, chopped chives, sharp hard cheese, sometimes boiled eggs and, of course, crispbread.

When you order a sandwich, don’t be surprised if it involves just a single slice of bread, the typical Swedish smörgås. The Swedish concept of open sandwiches dates back to the 1400s when thick slabs of bread were used as plates. In Sweden, the shrimp sandwich remains the option fit for a king. Piled high with a mix of boiled egg slices, lettuce, tomato and cucumber, this seafood snack is often topped with creamy romsås – crème fraîche blended with dill sprigs and roe. Shrimp sandwiches are such an integral part of Swedish culture, they have inspired a popular saying: ‘glida in på en räkmacka’ (literally ‘glide in on a shrimp sandwich,’ but roughly corresponding to the expression ‘get a free ride’), meaning to get an advantage without having done anything to deserve it.

Many Swedes grow up eating pea soup and pancakes every Thursday. This tradition has been upheld by the Swedish Armed Forces since World War II. While its true origins are widely debated – from Catholics not eating meat on Fridays, thus filling up on pea soup on Thursdays, to pea soup being very easy to prepare by maid servants who would work half-days on Thursdays – the tradition has well and truly stuck. Most traditional lunch restaurants serve pea soup and pancakes with lingonberry jam or any kind of jam (sylt) on Thursdays.

Colouring the window displays of bakeries throughout Sweden is the all-time favourite green princess cake (prinsesstårta), topped with a bright pink sugar rose. Comprising layers of yellow sponge cake lined with jam and vanilla custard, and then finished off with a heavy topping of whipped cream, the cake is carefully sealed with a thin layer of sugary sweet green marzipan. A relatively recent addition to Sweden’s culinary history, princess cake debuted in the 1920s, courtesy of Jenny Åkerström. She was a teacher to King Gustav V’s brother Prince Carl Bernadotte’s daughters – Princesses Margaretha, Märtha and Astrid – who loved it so much that they inspired its name. While the third week of September is officially princess cake week, this popular cake is now eaten during special festivals and is used to mark many milestones in people’s lives. Today, it comes in a variety of colours – from the classic green to yellow for Easter, red at Christmas, orange for Halloween and white for weddings.

Crayfish parties are popular in August, when warm summer evenings are spent feasting on these red bite-sized freshwater shellfish – or saltwater shellfish (then called langoustine or, funnily enough, Norway lobster) – in gardens and on balconies all over Sweden. Eaten only by Sweden’s upper-class citizens and aristocracy in the 1500s, crayfish have become a national delicacy enjoyed by all, with mass importation having significantly brought down the price over the centuries.

Every culture has at least one culinary speciality that makes both locals and visitors cringe. From late August to early September, a stinky tradition is upheld in Sweden, particularly in the northern part of the country. This is when cans of fermented sour Baltic herring are opened – a tradition dating back to the 1800s. The custom preferably takes place outdoors owing to the overpowering, unpleasant smell, which many compare with rotten eggs and raw sewage.

The average Swedish family, with two adults and two children, eats 1.2 kilos of sweets per week – most of it on Saturday, sweets day. Upheld mostly to protect people’s teeth and prevent dental cavities, the once-a-week tradition is historically linked to dubious medical practices. In the 1940s and 1950s, at Vipeholm Mental Hospital in Lund patients were fed large amounts of sweets to intentionally cause tooth decay, as part of a series of human experiments for research purposes. Based on findings from 1957 of the direct relationship between sweets and tooth decay, the Medical Board suggested Swedes eat sweets only once a week – an unwritten rule that many families still stick to.

Apart from Christmas, midsummer, midsommar is the most important holiday in the Swedish calendar. And for some, the very most important. The successful midsummer never-ending lunch party formula involves flowers in your hair, dancing around a pole, singing songs while drinking unsweetened, flavoured schnapps and downing a whole load of pickled herring, sill served with delightful new potatoes, chives and sour cream. All in all? A grand day out.

This is the night of the bonfire in Sweden, traditionally believed to ward off evil spirits, but now a festive way of getting rid of excess gardening odds and ends. Expect a lot of Swedish flags around as King Carl XVI Gustaf celebrates his birthday on Walpurgis, and on May Day, there’s a host of parades and festivals.

The province of Dalarna is in central Sweden with its western edge bordering Norway in the Swedish mountains. Dalarna seems to get first dibs on imagery that is considered more Swedish than ABBA and IKEA combined. A red-coloured cottage, glimmering lake in the foreground, deep forest in the background. Dalarna. The brightly-coloured model Dala Horse. Dalarna. Happy Swedes sporting traditional dress, celebrating midsummer, dancing around a maypole.

Spring is in the air for this year's Easter time in Sweden and there's lots of fun to be had! It's all about witches, egg hunts, colourful feathers and chocolate. Food at Easter in Sweden is all about sweets, sweets, more sweets — and of course a smörgåsbord at lunch time. For lunch, expect a lot of pickled herring and cured salmon, gravad lax. Easter dinner usually involves roast lamb and asparagus.

Falu red or falun red is a dye that is used in a deep red paint, well known for its use on wooden cottages and barns. The paint historically originated from various copper mines in Sweden. Most well known is the mine at Falun, in the province of Dalarna. In Finland, falu red is known as punamulta, after the pigment, which consists of finely divided hematite. Since the binder is starch, the paint is permeable to water. In Estonia, falu red is known as Rootsi punane and is most common in Western Estonia in the former Coastal Swedish territory.

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