Child labor Betzaida bRavo ayon

Of an estimated 215 child laborers around the globe: approximately 114 million (53%) are in Asia and the Pacific; 14 million (7%) live in Latin America; and 65 million (30%) live in sub-Saharan Africa.

Global number of children in child labour has declined by one third since 2000, from 246 million to 168 million children. More than half of them, 85 million, are in hazardous work (down from 171 million in 2000).

In 1924, Congress proposed a constitutional amendment prohibiting child labor, but the states did not ratify it. Then, in 1938, Congress passed the Fair Labor Standards Act. It fixed minimum ages of 16 for work during school hours, 14 for certain jobs after school, and 18 for dangerous work

The rise of child labor in the United States began in the late 1700s and early 1800s. When the Industrial Revolution started, many families had to find someone to work or they wouldn't survive.

The rise of child labor in the United States began in the late 1700s and early 1800s. When the Industrial Revolution started, many families had to find someone to work or they wouldn't survive.

Therefore it is a common stand among both industry, consumers, aid organizations and experts that child labour is acceptable as long as it is in fair conditions for the child. But child labor is illegal when children are not in school, when they use dangerous tools or perform hazardous tasks.

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.