Desirable Difficulties Learning may not be what you think

By Dukes Plum

Learning information through multiple perspectives influences one's learning because they can help one to understand a topic in different ways so that you can form your own well informed opinion on how complicated topics. Learning through several perspectives can also prevent seeing events with a “Single Story” or having a narrow minded single viewpoint in learning.

The theme in David and Goliath, that Malcolm Gladwell shows throughout the book in many different ways, is that people, even though they may seem to be huge underdogs, or facing an immense difficulty, your biggest disadvantages, may actually be your largest advantage. Also, what might seem like an advantage, may not be helpful at all.

Just because a classroom environment may look productive to most people, in fact, according to experts like teachers and psychologists, information may not be being learned as well as it seems to be. Introducing seemingly counter-intuitive difficulties may help learning be more effective.

Using Testing as a Learning Tool

How Spacing Can Help Long Term Memory Retention

Watch from 1:11 to 1:45

Feedback, is it always a good thing?

Reflection - Providing Cognitive Dissonance

Providing Cognitive dissonance to a reader is a very challenging task. What makes it easier is to look, as we have also been studying, through multiple perspectives. By doing this, we may be able to combine those perspectives to see information through a new and different lens and so show that Cognitive Dissonance. Looking for cognitive dissonance often requires you to give up what you previously thought new knew and dig deep for resources about a topic

Works Cited

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