It'll be scary sometimes By Santiago Espejel

My great-great-grandfather on my father's side was born free in Ohio, 1832
Built his home and farmed his land,
Then dug for coal when farming wasn't enough
Fought hard in the war.

The first part of this poem shows how William Woodson worked hard in order to sustain his free family in Ohio. He worked hard on his own, but when farming didn't provide him with enough money, he started working in a more dangerous and unhealthy job in order to keep his family living a decent life. When the Civil War broke out, he fought for his ideals of ending slavery and keeping a unified country. He fought hard and gave up his life for his cause. These acts show us how brave and determined William Woodson was to keep his family happy and fight for his fellow African Americans

His name now on the civil war memorial: William J. Woodson United States Colored Troops, Union, Company B 5th Regt. A long time dead but living still among the other soldiers on that monument in Washington, D.C
His son was sent to Nelsonville lived with his aunt

William Woodson Jr. was strong like his father. He had to go live with his aunt alone at a young age due to his father's death. He is then enrolled to an all-white school. Given the times, he was probably bullied and excluded in all activities within and out of school. This shows how perserverent he was because lots of white kids would leave the school and start protesting for him to leave. It would probably have taken him a lot to keep going back to that school every day.

William Woodson the only brown boy in an all white school.
You'll face this in your life someday, my mother will tells us over and over again.
A moment when you walk into a room and no one there is like you.
It'll be scary sometimes. But think of William Woodson and you'll be all right.

These last lines show that their mother keeps reminding them that they will be in difficult situations sometimes such as going to a school where they are the only black kids. She also reminds them though, that if they think of William Woodson, they will be brave and keep moving forward. They will also know that if he was able to do it, they can too.

This can apply to anyone if they are facing the same situation as these African Americans were such as being the only one different in a room where no one wants you there. This can happen to anyone with any situation whether its religion, race, or nationality. The message in this poem can help any one in this problem and encourage them to be brave and keep going just like these African Americans did.

This can apply to anyone if they are facing the same situation as these African Americans were such as being the only one different in a room where no one wants you there. This can happen to anyone with any situation whether its religion, race, or nationality. The message in this poem can help any one in this problem and encourage them to be brave and keep going just like these African Americans did.

It'll be scary

Sometimes

My great-great grandfather on my father's side

Was born free in Ohio,

1832

Built his home and farmed his land,

Then dug for coal when the farming

Wasn't enough. Fought hard

In the war. His name in stone now

On the Civil War Memorial:

William J. Woodson

United States Colored Troops,

Union, Company B 5th Regt.

A long time dead but living still

Among the other soldiers

On that monument in Washington, D.C.

His son was sent to Nelsonville

Lived with his aunt

William Woodson

The only brown boy in an all-white school.

You'll face this in your life someday,

My mother will tell us

Over and over again.

A moment when you walk into a room and

No one there is like you.

It'll be scary sometimes. But think of William Woodson

And you'll be alright.

(P. 13-14)

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