The US Constitution 6 Guiding principles - James Ciesluk

The U.S. Constitution established America's national government and fundamental laws, and guaranteed certain basic rights for its citizens. The document itself was written during the Philadelphia Convention, now known as the Constitutional Convention, starting from May 25 to September 17, It was officially signed on September 17, 1787.

The first official national flag, also known as the Stars and Stripes, was approved by the Continental Congress on June 14, 1777. The blue canton contained 13 stars, representing the original 13 colonies, but the layout varied.

Popular Sovereignty

Popular sovereignty or the sovereignty of the people's rule, is the principle that the authority of a state and its government is created and sustained by the consent of its people, through their elected representatives. In the document's Preamble it states, ''We the people of the United States . . . do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America.' Included in Article V of the Constitution, which provides the means to amend the Constitution through the elected representatives of the people.

Limited Government

A limited government is a political system where forces are restricted through delegated and higher powers. The United States Constitution for example, was designed to limit government's role to its core functions, that is to preserve individual liberty and protect private property. The Ninth Amendment and Tenth Amendment, spell out the principle of limited government. The Ninth Amendment to the United States Constitution addresses rights, retained by the people, that are not specifically associated in the Constitution.

Separation of Powers

The separation of powers is the grant that reprieves and pardons for offences against the United States except in cases of impeachment. This philosophy heavily influenced the writing of the United States Constitution, according to which the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the United States government are kept distinct in order to prevent abuse of power. The Legislative, composed of the House and Senate, is set up in Article 1. The Executive, composed of the President, Vice-President, and the Departments, is set up in Article 2.

Federalism

The separation of powers is the grant that reprieves and pardons for offences against the United States except in cases of impeachment. This philosophy heavily influenced the writing of the United States Constitution, according to which the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial branches of the United States government are kept distinct in order to prevent abuse of power.

Checks and Balances

The system of checks and balances is an important part of the Constitution. With checks and balances, each of the three branches of government can limit the powers of the others. This way, no one branch becomes too powerful. The Legislative composed of the House and Senate, is set up in Article 1. The Executive, composed of the President Vice- President and the Departments.

Representative Government

Representative Government is an electoral system where citizens vote to elect people to represent their interests and concerns. Those elected meet to debate and make laws on behalf of the whole community or society, instead of the people voting directly on laws and other debates. A representative democracy is a system of government in which all eligible citizens vote on representatives to pass laws for them. You can find examples as well as who is directly eligible to vote / run in Art 4. Sec 2. Cl 1.

TEST YOUR SKILLS: QUIZ

1. What amendments apply to Limited Government?

2. How many branches of government are their?

3. What is the principle of keeping power in check?

4. What do the original 13 stars on the flag represent?

5. What do you think about the preambles introduction sentence, should we as citizen have the power to dictate our government?

6. What would happen if we changed the way the president was elected to popular vote?

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James Ciesluk
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