Charles Marion Russell Emma Brandenburg

Charles Marion Russell was an American artist that was born on March 19, 1864 in St. Louis Missouri, and died on October 24, 1926. He was an artist who was always sketching, he has painted over 2,000 artwork pieces of cowboys, Indians, and landscapes of the western United States. When he was little, he learned to ride horses at Hazel Dell Farm in Illinois, on the famous civil war horse, named Great Britain. When he was 16, he dropped out of school and moved to Montana. In 1882, when Russell was 18, he was working on cattle hand. In the winter of 1886-1887 he found his talent and became famous for his first piece, "Waiting For A Chinook". In 1896, Charles Marion Russell met the love of his life and got married to Nancy Cooper. And in 1897, the Russells moved to Great Falls, Montana. Where he lived most of his life and made many artworks. Charles died on October 24, 1926 in Great Falls. All of the children where released from school and attended his funeral. His coffin was displayed in a glass-sided coach, pulled by four black horses.

"Waiting For A Chinook"
"Meat's Not Meat Till It's in the Pan"
"A Slick Rider"
"Waiting For A Chinook Jr."

My piece of artwork is Waiting for a Chinook Jr. It has two wolves circling a starving cow in the cold snow. The materials I used for this piece are Acrylic paints and the main technique I used was sponging. Charles Marion Russell inspired this piece. I tried to show fear and loneliness in my artwork, the wolves circling the very last, starving cow. Some goals I have as an artist is to show certain emotions, and my piece definitely reached this goal. I learned in creating this piece that if I take my time, I can make lines meet. The final piece is what I imagined, because of the snow that I sponged a lot to make look like snow. This piece will influence other artworks because of the blend of different colors and the technique of sponging.

Credits:

Created with images by tpsdave - "charles russell art painting"

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