Women's March Community MACKENZIE, LIzette, JULIA

O HEY THERE

In response to Donald Trumps inauguration on January 20th 2017 citizens of the United States join together across the nation one day later to make a statement in opposition of Trump’s values. This election insulted and threatened women, immigrants, those with diverse religious faiths, people who identify as LGBT, people with disabilities, and others. Many Americans stood together to defend their human rights.

ESSAY

On January 21st 2017 women from all over the United States marched in their towns and cities for their rights. This women’s march movement is a colorful ethnic, national, political, international community that brings men and women together. This isn’t your typical local community, it’s a variety that has been going on for years and each time it continues to grow with further aptitude. Young women have been fighting for their rights since the early 1920's and continue to do so in today’s society. We belong to a community where young women have the right to be and choose what they want to do with their lives and their bodies because human rights are women’s rights, and women’s rights are human rights. Even if it means they have to stride to do so.

When you're marching, screaming, fighting and declaring for what you believe in, you get this tingling powerful strength and feeling that makes you feel alive. The atmosphere was warm and energetic, despite the cold nipping at our feet as we inched along the streets of San Francisco. There in the city, signs were hoisted into the air bashing Trump’s environmental beliefs, misogyny, racism, heterosexis and tax issues. But standing shoulder-to-shoulder amongst masses of passionate, smiling activists made me swell with pride. By coming together, voicing our emotions and opinions, we’ve gathered courage and inspiration for more to be done.The Women’s March was not just about women, or about Trump—it was the start of a revolution for all. I look at this as more of an emotional experience rather than a political one.

This most recent march has made one of the biggest impacts in a lot of people’s lives, all genders included but especially women. Because the moment your feet step into those streets to march, you become aware of your surroundings and start to admire every strong individual around you. Women are told that they can’t take the job or role of a man, yet that is false. There are single mothers all over the world today who struggle and still manage to raise children all by themselves. This community is surrounded by many beautiful young women who can be the future, and won’t be stopped by our so called “president”, Donald Trump. Women in the 21st century are without a doubt different than women in the 20th century and it’s our turn to take charge and feel that power we deserve rather than be treated as if we lived in 1919.

Young Women’s Community isn’t just for the ‘feminist’, it’s for anyone who believes that women’s rights are just as important as human rights. Therefore we must create a community/ society in which women- including Black women, Native women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women etc. are free and able to care for and nurture their families, however they are formed, in a healthy and safe environment. Communities like this bring good vibes and people closer to the point that they are comfortable with themselves. Women are capable of much more than just giving birth, they can bring affirmative, supportive, and encouraging demonstrations to little girls that can hopefully take action in from our younger generation as we do today.

When Young Women’s community is mentioned I think of positive, empowering and amazing ladies who have been fighting and will continue to do so until justice is served and feel equally treated. Young Women’s community should teach the incoming generations to be happy and secure about who they are. We are a community that likes to stick together and not give up on what we believe in, we are craving freedom, love, peace and joyful life, we won’t stop until we get it; we are warriors.

METAPHOR

The women's march community is like a box of crayons. Each distinctive color is brought together on a page to capture arts true beauty. Each color has its own role and personality just like those who take part in our community.

INTERVIEW ONE

Our first interview was with Emily Sackett, a seventeen year old senior who is well known both in and outside of the band. Before we started interviewing her, we asked a few simple questions about herself to make a smooth transition into some deeper thoughts. Emily was fun to interview because she is a very open person and had no problem diving deep into each question.

Q: How many women are in your household?

A: Two

Q: Do you feel women are treated equally? Why/Why not?

A: I do not think women are treated equally because there’s still a gender age gap and they have significant more societal expectations than men.

Q: Did you attend the women’s march on January 21st? How was it? Did you hear about it?

A: I did not but my step mom did. She said it was more of a slow walk then a march because it was so crowded, but it was good. I did hear about it.

Q: Are you supportive of Trump’s decision to defund Planned Parenthood? Why/Why not?

A: I do not support that decision because it should never be up to a man to decide what a women should do with her reproductive organs.

Q: Who do you seek as a good role model for the women’s youth community?

A: I seek Michelle Obama because she lives a healthy life and holds herself very high. She speaks up for herself and leads a good example.

Q: What does women’s youth mean to you?

A: It means a place where people feel safe and supported by each other.

Q: As a women who do you feel is influential to you?

A: I feel my mom and my step-mom are a strong influence because they both carry themselves high and work good jobs to support the family.

Q: What can a women do in her daily life to stand up for her rights?

A: A women can go get a education, be independent, and be an example to other women to help motivate them in a positive way.

INTERVIEW TWO

Our second interview was Alyssa Holguin (16), she has a big role in the Avid Community. Alyssa was easy to interview because she has a strong opinion toward women’s rights, so her responses were very substantial.

Q: How many women are in your household?

A: 2

Q: Do you feel women are treated equally? Why/Why not?

A: I feel like women are not treated equally, there’s a wage gap with women’s jobs vs men’s jobs.

Q: Did you attend the women’s march on January 1st? How was it? Did you hear about it?

A: I didn’t attend the march, but i heard about it

Q: Are you supportive of Trump’s decision to defund Planned Parenthood? Why/Why not?

A: I am not supportive for Trump defunding Planned Parenthood because it’s a necessary thing for women to have.

Q: Who do you seek as a good role model for the women’s youth community?

A: I seek Michelle Obama because shes a positive influence on the women’s community and has good intentions.

Q: What does women’s youth mean to you?

A: Its women coming together and supporting one another.

Q: As a women who do you feel is influential to you?

A: My cousin Amby is a strong influential woman in my life because she sticks up for herself and shows me that i can be completely happy being independent.

Q: What can a women do in her daily life to stand up for her rights?

A: A woman can stick up for herself and not let her gender get in the way of accomplishing things.

INTERVIEW THREE

Our last and best interview was Jenny Rooney,an inspiring english teacher. We chose to interview her because we knew she would have strong opinions on the questions we were asking. We also enjoyed understanding her beliefs toward women rights.

Q: How many women are in your household?

A: 1

Q: Do you feel women are treated equally? Why/Why not?

A: I think it depends on the situation. As i got older i realized that if a young man was speaking in college, people more attentively listened more to men. Women seem to be a little more polite and not as willing to speak up.

Q: Did you attend the women’s march on January 1st? How was it? Did you hear about it?

A: I did not attend. My step mom attended and said it was really empowering.

Q: Are you supportive of Trump’s decision to defund Planned Parenthood? Why/Why not?

A: I’m not supportive of it, but i do understand for religious reasons why people are against abortion. It´s a place where women can feel safe and get the things that they need.Q: Who do you seek as a good role model for the women’s youth community?

A: Like many women, I admire Michelle Obama because shes self made and pushes herself.

Q: What does women’s youth mean to you?

A: Women’s youth community is young women hanging out with each other, and helping out in the community. Also supporting each other and respecting each other.

Q: As a women who do you feel is influential to you?

A: My friends mom named Jamie, she is a strong women and treats her children really good. I also admired my college professor because she was a strong feminist and loves being a women.

Q: What can a women do in her daily life to stand up for her rights?

A: think she could be assertive and not hold back. Have a voice in society and speak up for yourself.

Thank you

Credits:

Created with images by bones64 - "women's march political rally" • alans1948 - "womens-march-07772" • ufcw770 - "Womens-March-2017-01" • lcpuro - "Women's March Los Angeles" • bones64 - "women's march sign child" • lcpuro - "Women's March Los Angeles"

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