No More Eye Candy Inspiring Visual Imagination and Assessing Creativity Through Critical Thinking bit.ly/eyecandy22

JACLYN B. STEVENS, M.Ed | DIGITAL LEARNING COACH | FRIDAY INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL INNOVATION, NC STATE UNIVERSITY

@JACLYNBSTEVENS | JACLYNBSTEVENS.COM | bit.ly/eyecandy22

OVERVIEW

Every day, you are introducing cutting-edge technologies that allow students to mash-up and create images in sophisticated ways….

Yet with so many tools making it simple to drag-and-drop, how do we guide students beyond eye candy to find, evaluate, and use creative visual images that push through to deeper learning and expression?

But beyond that, the experience and knowledge students acquire from their study of thinking critically about mass communication material will be applicable in all subject areas, in all careers, and in their daily lives.

OBJECTIVES - 45 minutes

We will learn to guide and assess students' visual products for creative and critical thinking by:

  • VISUALIZING the types of images needed to provide evidence relevant to their task or claim;
  • Consider the RELEVANCE, CREDIBILITY, and QUALITY of the visual components students' discover;
  • CREATING strong visual claims that support student arguments or explanations; and,
  • ENGAGE in honest self-assessment of students' creativity and critical thinking in the visual products.

IMMERSION | you can't talk about it... you have to do it.

Cities around the country have considered legislation on soft drinks. Your town is now considering creating a law limiting soft drink serving size as well. Find an image with a visually-impactful message for a specific audience of your choice in your town....

  1. FIND a COPYRIGHT FREE IMAGE that supports your views on this issue.
  2. SHARE the image you have chosen, write a brief statement about why you chose the image, and CITE YOUR SOURCE.
  • How did you decide what image/ content to use?
  • What did you notice about selecting?
  • Problems encountered?
  • Questions that arise?

IF THIS WERE THE CLASSROOM

Cities around the country have considered legislation on soft drinks. Your town is now considering creating a law limiting soft drink serving size as well. Using our toolkit of text, images, and data as source material, CREATE a visually-impactful message for a specific audience of your choice in your town.

  1. Review our TOOLKIT OF RESOURCES, for images & data.
  2. CHOOSE a stance.
  3. CREATE your own visually-impactful message with an audience in mind. (Draw and/or use the digital tool of your choice).
  4. SHARE your creation via Padlet with an statement of explanation.

CAN CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION BE TAUGHT

1. DESIGN PROJECTS TO BRING OUT CREATIVITY

Integrating the arts is an obvious example of how you can bring out students’ creativity. Also think about how your students might create an original product or come up with solutions to a problem – the more authentic, the better, since an important part of the innovation process involves understanding your audience or end-user.

2. CREATE A CULTURE THAT PROMOTES CREATIVITY & INNOVATION

It’s OK to offer divergent ideas, ask new questions, and try, fail, and try again. Students should feel that it’s safe to take risks and not be penalized (like, say, being given a low grade for an early draft or prototype). They should be in the habit of giving and receiving critical feedback among peers.

3. SCAFFOLD FOR CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION

Build student competency by teaching them to use a process for innovation. Such processes typically include steps such as understanding the purpose and audience/user; generating ideas; evaluating and selecting ideas; testing and refining ideas through a cycle of feedback and revision; developing and presenting a final product or solution.

YES! Creativity and Innovation can be taught.... But only if we understand that every visual has an inherent claim.

(information, imagery, messages, eye-catching, personal bias...)

From our of our workflow we relearn what our students are experiencing and we unpack the complexities involved in the creative process.

If we want our students to create... they must first understand the process.

HOW DO WE COMMUNICATE?
INTERPRETING AN IMAGE | COPYRIGHT 2006, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Every visual has an inherent claim.

(information, imagery, messages, eye-catching, personal bias...)

FORENSICS OF AN IMAGE

Our culture is again facing a rash of "FAKE NEWS", yet without laws dictating that only factual information is posted online: it would be unrealistic to do so. Therefore, we need to arm ourselves, and our students with the necessary skills to know what is real, and what is not.

IMAGES CAN SPARK AMAZING DISCUSSIONS AND CREATE PERSONAL DISCOVERY.

Tools that support this kind of discussion...

HOW DO I ASSESS THE VISUAL ARGUMENT?

  • Define the Creative Challenge (by asking questions such as: Who needs this, and why? What are their needs and interests?)
  • Identify Sources of Information (by finding unusual ways or places to get information; by promoting divergent perspectives during discussions – which btw is a Common Core standard)
  • Generate and Select Ideas (by using idea-generating techniques, evaluating ideas and selecting the best one to try, using imagination to shape ideas, and seek out and use feedback)
  • Present Work to Users/Target Audience (by creating interesting presentations)

REFLECTION | How will you encourage students to....

  • MODEL visual thinking skills;
  • have VOICE and CHOICE in the products created;
  • VISUALIZE and CREATE the type of images needed to provide evidence relevant to the task or claim;
  • CRITIQUE the relevance, credibility, and quality of the visual components discovered and/or created;
  • ENGAGE in honest self-assessment and reflection of their creativity and critical thinking?

Jaclyn B. Stevens | Friday Institute

jlbell@ncsu.edu | @jaclynbstevens | jaclynbstevens.com

PLEASE TAKE A MOMENT TO SHARE YOUR FEEDBACK

CLICK HERE ---> FEEDBACK IS HOW I GROW <--- CLICK HERE

Credits:

Created with images by Dean Hochman - "foam board" • cmart29 - "colour smoke rainbow" • coyot - "lens photo photography" • qimono - "doors choices choose" • Lauryn McDowell - "Hallelujah" • cogdogblog - "Fresh Start" • edenpictures - "Create" • Line-tOodLinGfc - "abstract art backdrop" • zeevveez - "Color Abstract" • geralt - "shoe sole batch print" • andymag - "Red and blue" • kevin dooley - "Reflection" • Alexas_Fotos - "idea light bulb enlightenment"

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