rock classification the 3 main types of rocks

Sedimentary rocks are types of rock that are formed by the deposition and subsequent cementation of that material at the Earth's surface and within bodies of water.

Clastic sedimentary rocks are formed from mechanical weathering debris.

There are three main types of sedimentary rocks: Clastic: your basic sedimentary rock. ... Chemical: many of these form when standing water evaporates, leaving dissolved minerals behind. ... Organic: any accumulation of sedimentary debris caused by organic processes.
characteristics of sedimentary rocks
Sedimentation is the collective name for processes that cause mineral and/or organic particles (detritus) to settle and accumulate or minerals to precipitate from a solution.
examples of clastic rocks

Chemical sedimentary rocks form when dissolved materials precipitate from solution.

examples of chemical sedimentary rocks

Organic sedimentary rocks form from the accumulation of plant or animal debris.

examples of organic rocks

Sedimentary rocks are found covering a majority of the Earth's upper crust.

Metamorphic rocks have been modified by heat, pressure, and chemical processes, usually while buried deep below Earth's surface. Exposure to these extreme conditions has altered the mineralogy, texture, and chemical composition of the rocks.

Formation of metamorphic rocks. Metamorphic rocks are created by the physical or chemical alteration by heat and pressure of an existing igneous or sedimentary material into a denser form.

Metamorphic rocks are created by the physical or chemical alteration by heat and pressure of an existing igneous or sedimentary material into a denser form.

Examples of metamorphic rocks include anthracite, quartzite, marble, slate, granulite, gneiss and schist.

A metamorphic rock is a result of a transformation of a pre-existing rock.

Igneous rock (derived from the Latin word ignis meaning fire), or magmatic rock, is one of the three main rock types, the others being sedimentary and metamorphic.

Igneous rock is formed when magma cools and solidifies, it may do this above or below the Earth's surface.
These atoms and molecule rearrange themselves into mineral grains as the magma cools, forming rock as the mineral grains grow together
There are two basic types. Intrusive igneous rocks crystallize below Earth's surface, and the slow cooling that occurs there allows large crystals to form. Extrusive igneous rocks erupt onto the surface, where they cool quickly to form small crystals. Some cool so quickly that they form an amorphous glass.

Know the difference between the three major rock types.

Igneous rocks are made from the rapid or slow cooling of magma/lava.

Metamorphic rocks change form based on the influence of heat, pressure, or chemical activity.

Sedimentary rocks are essentially formed by pieces of smaller rocks, fossils, and sediments.

Credits:

Created with images by sridgway - "Sedimentary rocks everywhere" • sarajuggernaut - "stones rocks pebbles" • James St. John - "Rock salt (halitite) (Klodawa Salt Dome, Zechstein Formation, Upper Permian; Klodawa Salt Mine, central Poland) 1" • James St. John - "Folded jaspilite banded iron formation (BIF) (Hamersely Group, Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic, ~2.47-2.55 Ga; Hamersley Range, Western Australia)" • James St. John - "Diatomite (Monterey Formation, Miocene; diatomite quarry just south of Lompoc, California, USA)" • James St. John - "Black shale" • James St. John - "Snowflake obsidian" • James St. John - "Mahogany obsidian" • James St. John - "Rock gypsum (gyprock) 2" • James St. John - "Graywacke" • James St. John - "Oncolitic limestone (Gros Ventre Formation, Upper Cambrian; Beartooth Butte, Wyoming, USA) 2" • James St. John - "Cherry blossom stones (pinite) in hornfels (mid-Cretaceous, 98 Ma; Mikata, Honshu Island, southern Japan)" • James St. John - "Grindstone from an end-Pleistocene large pothole (Interstate State Park, Taylors Falls, Minnesota, USA) 7" • allispossible.org.uk - "Textures from the seadside" • James St. John - "Glendonite (Conjola Formation, Lower Permian; coastal outcrop at Dolphin Beach, just southwest of Ulladulla, coastal New South Wales, far-southeastern Australia)" • Mattias F - "Rocks at Kapplasse" • James St. John - "Gold mass (alluvial gold) (Kalgoorlie region, Western Australia) 1" • James St. John - "Anthracite coal (Mammoth Coal, Llewelyn Formation, Middle Pennsylvanian; Pioneer Tunnel Coal Mine, Ashland, Pennsylvania, USA)" • James St. John - "Baked sedimentary xenoliths in clinker (Wasatch Formation, Lower Eocene; coal fire metamorphism at 19 ka, Late Pleistocene; large block at Interstate 90 west-bound hilltop rest area, east of Buffalo, Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA) 3" • James St. John - "Gold in iron oxide (Highland Mining District, Silver Bow County, Montana, USA)" • James St. John - "Obsidian" • James St. John - "Snowflake obsidian" • James St. John - "Zinciferous marble (Franklin Marble, Mesoproterozoic, 1.03-1.08 Ga; zinc mine in Franklin, northern New Jersey, USA) 1" • James St. John - "Cherry blossom stones (pinite) in hornfels (mid-Cretaceous, 98 Ma; Mikata, Honshu Island, southern Japan)" • James St. John - "Red scoria" • James St. John - "Fairburn Agate (ultimately derived from the Minnelusa Formation, Pennsylvanian-Permian; collected east of the Black Hills, western South Dakota, USA) 2"

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.