Alligator By: Ethan Richardson

Introduction

Organism

This organisms common name is Alligator and its scientific name is Alligator Mississippiensis.

Classification

Kingdom: Animal

Phylum: Chordate

Class: Reptile

Order: Crocodiles

Family: Alligators

Genus: Alligators

Species: Crocodilian

Habitat

Swamps, freshwater, ponds, marshes, rivers, lakes, and wetlands.

Evolution

The alligator first evolved about 245 million years ago

About 80 million years ago during the Cretaceous period crocodilians appeared.

Morphological and Molecular Evidence

Close Relatives of the Alligator

Aegisuchus

Anatosuchus

Angistorhinus

Araripesuchus

Armadillosuchus

Baurusuchus

Carnufex

Champsosaurus

Culebrasuchus

The changes from prehistoric and modern alligator has changed greatly from size, shape, and color.

Homologous Structures

A homologous structure is an organ or bone that's in multiple living things and is used differently but came from the same past ancestor.

These 4 different living things all have the same bones but are used in different ways.

Vestigial structures

are parts of the body that evolved from a past ancestor and have no use at all

Transitional fossils:

are fossils that show the similarities of the previous and present living thing

Comparative Embryology

Development of alligator

Comparative embryology:

is the way animals are compared and contrasts to see if the living things is related or not

Credits:

Created with images by fxxu - "crocodile tooth reptile" • zigazou76 - "Alligator" • judygva (back in town and trying to catch up) - "Devil's Garden, Hendry County, Florida" • JakeWilliamHeckey - "alligator zoo wildlife" • jared422_80 - "Gainesville - Florida Museum of Natural History - Alligator Skeleton"

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.