Helen keller blind and deaf

Helen Keller was born on June 27, 1880 in Tuscumbia, Alabama. When she was 19 months old, she had an illness called brain fever. A few days after the illness stopped, she lost her sight and hearing.

How Helen Keller Became Famous

Helen's childhood experiences influenced her achievements as an adult by being blind and deaf, because when her story of being both blind and deaf was heard around the world, she started becoming famous. When Helen got older, she started standing up for Blind people, and had speeches. Helen Keller traveled around the world to make appearances and speeches.

This is Helen Keller's picture for the book she wrote called, The Story Life.

Helen's life

When Helen Keller was born on June 27, 1880, in Tuscumbia in northern Alabama. At nineteen months old, Helen had an illness called brain fever. After the illness stopped, Helen lost both her sight and hearing. Helen's mother did not notice that Helen was both blind and deaf until she didn't react to the dinner bell or when someone waved their hand in front of her face. As Helen Keller was growing, she had a hard time learning because she couldn't hear or see. So Helen's parents hired a teacher named Anne Sullivan, who taught Helen. Anne Sullivan taught Helen Keller by using her finger to write down, or to draw a picture that would show or tell Helen what was going on, or where they were. When Helen Keller was older, she stood up for blind people. At the age of 75, Helen Keller traveled to 35 countries to make appearances and speeches that would bring encouragement and inspiration to lots of people. When Helen was sleeping, she died on June 1,1968.

This is Helen Keller as a child

challenges that Helen faced

Helen Keller faced challenges like being both blind and deaf. It was challenging for her because, people are supposed to be able to hear what other people say. If you can't see you don't know who you are talking to. So it was challenging for Helen at school, but Anne Sullivan was there to translate what the teacher was saying, or what the paper was saying.

why Helen Keller is important

Helen Keller is important because, she gave speeches that were inspirational. Helen Keller also was in campaigns for people in need, especially blind people. Helen Keller was famous for her story, because it was well-known. All these things changed our lives today because if it weren't for Helen Keller, we wouldn't think that much about blind and deaf people.

Helen Keller's contributions

Helen's contributions to the society were, helping people by being in a campaign to support blind people, and joined organizations to help people less fortunate.

Helen Keller is Admirable

Helen Keller is admirable because she helped a lot of people and gave speeches that inspired people. Helen is also known for her story, and how she lost both her sight and hearing.

Biopoem

Helen

Inspirational, caring, helpful

Daughter of Katherine Adams Keller

Who loved giving to others, giving speeches, and writing books

Who experienced being mad, joyful, and sad

Who feared about being deaf, blind, and that she would never see again

Who helped less fortunate, and blind people

Who wanted to help other people and give out speeches

Born in Tuscumbia, Alabama

Keller

Bibliography

  • Sullivan, Anne, and John, Macy. The Story Of My Life. New York: Roger Shattuck, 2003. United States Of America.
  • “Helen Keller.” Biography.com, A&E Networks Television, 30 Nov. 2016, www.biography.com/people/helen-keller-9361967#synopsis. Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.
  • “Helen Keller.” Helen Keller, 1904. Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.
  • “Helen Keller.” Printrest, 1889. Accessed 6 Mar. 2017.

Credits:

Created with images by City of Boston Archives - "Photograph of a photograph of Helen Keller in 1890, at ten years old"

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