The Blessing of Industrial Development Karen Morales Hour 5

The Industrial Revolution was sweeping the world in the 1800's. This revolution started in the late 18th century in England where it expanded to other countries. The Industrial Revolution was a time when rural farming societies became industrial and urban. In this time period, new inventions were made. Inventions that impacted who we are today as a nation. The rapid Industrial Development has been a blessing for Americans because of new inventions, cotton industry, and more job opportunities for all people.

1860 Telegraph

The Inventions of the Industrial Development

In the 19th century, new inventions and technologies were spurring up the Market Revolution. The invention of the steam boat changed the Market Revolution. Robert Fulton (1765-1815) introduced the first steamboat to the nation in 1807 named Clermont. Robert Fulton established and managed steamboat lines 8 years after his first invention in 1807 and later died in 1815 in New York City. The nation was greatly affected by the telegraph. A telegraph was a way to communicate from across a distance. Morse code came to be after the telegraph was invented. Morse Code is a system for representing letters, numbers and punctuation marks by arranging dots, dashes and spaces. These messages were sent to their location by the telegraph. Other inventions that impacted Americans were the Power Loom, Whale Oil Lamps and new roads.

Cotton is King

One of the biggest inventions during the late 1700's was Eli Whitney's Cotton Gin. The cotton gin is a machine that produced cotton quickly. By 1800 cotton production had increased from about 3,000 bales a year to 73,000 bales a year according to Britannica. Not only did Americans rely on the Slave-produced cotton but other countries like Great Britain and England relied on American Cotton. By 1850, 3/4 of the worlds cotton was being produced in the United States. The economy of the United States was greatly impacted by the cotton that slaves were producing with the magnificent cotton gin. During the 19th century, cotton was also knows as "White Gold" because the plant was so easy to grow and the cotton gin made it easier to take out the seeds which made the cotton production faster and more money was made.

Women Factory Workers

Job Opportunities for Whites, Immigrants and Women

During the rapid Industrial Revolution, factories formed all around the nation. Samuel Slater was a big part of factory production. Slater was an apprentice in a factory that made textile machinery in England. When he heard that the United States needed skilled mechanics, he left England and started his new life in the United States in 1789. Slater carried all of the designs and blueprints to the United States by memory so the U.S would be as successful as England factories. He did not dare to bring physical drawings of the designs because he did not want to get caught. Therefore the memory of Samuel Slater changed the Industrial Revolution forever. Having lots of factories being built gave more job opportunities to Whites. Not only were Whites benefited with these opportunities but so were immigrants and even women. Having these jobs meant less poverty even if immigrants and women barely got enough money to support themselves.

Works Cited

"Eli Whitney." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Eli-Whitney/277732. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Feminism: women factory workers, about 1910. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/124168. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Harper’s Weekly”: black slaves working the first cotton gin. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/181816. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

* "Robert Fulton." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Robert-Fulton/274460. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

"Samuel Slater." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Samuel-Slater/277087. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Telegraph." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/telegraph/277288. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Telegraph. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/215549. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

"Why Was Cotton 'King'?" PBS.org. N.p., n.d. Web. 9 Mar. 2017. <http://www.pbs.org/wnet/african-americans-many-rivers-to-cross/history/why-was-cotton-king/

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.