Emotion

EQ: Are Emotions Universal?

Elective Reading: “This app knows how you feel--from the look on your face” TED Talk

https://www.ted.com/talks/rana_el_kaliouby_this_app_knows_how_you_feel_from_the_look_on_your_face?language=en

Evidence:

Based on the elective reading, emotions are universal.

This is because the app created by Rana el Kaliouby is designed to detect the facial expression from what it has been programed to remember.

The characteristics detected by the app: raised eyebrows, furrowed brows, frown, disgust, joy, smile, valence and engagement.

On the subject of emojis/emoticons, the fact that most people can effectively use emojis means that most people understand the facial expressions associated to certain emotions. In the TED Talk, Kaliouby spoke about how her only way to express her emotions during college would be while calling her parents or while texting friends, neither of which include facial expressions. However, texting does include emojis, a way of expressing facial expressions that are recognizable by most people, making emotions universal.

Whilst emotions are universal to a certain degree, there are some fallibilities in the technology that Kaliouby has developed. How can we trust technology and rely on technology to determine and be able to read our emotions? Kaliouby app is designed to detect facial expressions, however there is more to emotion than just how you look. Emotion most directly works alongside how you feel, and an app on a phone or ipad cannot sense how one feels. Although emotions are most certainly universal to an extent, an app has its limitations and cannot be 100% accurate.

EQ: Are Emotions Universal?

Emotions are universal to a certain degree. Based on Rana el Kaliouby’s app and ted talk, the general physical depiction of emotion is fairly universal. Rana el Kalibouy developed an app made to detect the facial expressions of certain emotions it has been programmed to remember. The app detects common and universal facial expressions linked to different emotions such as: raised eyebrows, furrowed brows, frown, disgust, joy, smile, valence and engagement. While Kalibouy’s app proves to a degree that most physical representations are universal, so does our use of emoticons/emojis on social media or technological devices. Most people can effectively use emojis, and this proves that most people understand universally, the general facial expressions associated with certain emotions. In Kalibouy’s speech, she spoke about how her only way to express her emotions during college would be while calling her parents or while texting friends, neither of which include facial expressions. On the other hand, texting does include emojis, which is a way of expressing facial expressions that are recognizable by most people, making emotions universal. Whilst emotions are universal to a certain degree, there are some fallibilities in the technology that Kaliouby has developed. How can we trust technology and rely on technology to determine and be able to read our emotions? Kaliouby app is designed to detect facial expressions, however there is more to emotion than just how you look. Emotion most directly works alongside how you feel, and an app on a phone or ipad cannot sense how one feels. Although emotions are most certainly universal to an extent, an app has its limitations and cannot be 100% accurate.

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