Music and Work: An Amazing Combination Alena Seepaul

"When taking on a task or a project, music can be so valuable to anyone who is looking to get things done faster, more enthusiastically, and with more focus."

Many people listen to music while doing some sort of task, whether it’s while doing homework, cooking, cleaning, driving, exercising, or getting ready to go out. Why is that? It has become such a normal thing nowadays. Is it because music helps one concentrate? Does music Increase productivity? Or does it just make whatever you’re doing fun? Here’s why: It can help concentration and it can limit distraction. Listening to music can even make doing a project a lot more fun. Listening to music can also increase enthusiasm when going about said task, especially if one listens to music they like. Many feel more connected and that increases enthusiasm going about a project. This can also make work more fun because of that enthusiasm boost. The brain and music have a special relationship where music elicits a positive response from the brain. That positive response is what gives that enthusiasm and makes it more likely to get whatever it is done. The music can heighten concentration. Even though some say that music is distracting, surprisingly, listening to music will help focusing directly on the task.

Musical Studying
"Researchers from Wake Forest School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Greensboro recruited 21 young adults and placed them in an MRI scanner as they played songs of different genres. he researchers played the subjects’ favorite songs and scanned their brains using an MRI to see how a person's feelings about that song influenced his or her brain activity. When the research subjects listened to their favorite song, the MRI showed that they were better connected and focused on what is being done at the moment."

The brain and music have a extraordinary relationship. Interestingly enough, there is a specific array of music genres that one’s brain prefers. These are the genres of music songs one enjoys. Experiments show how the brain elicits a pleasurable response when listening to music, especially the genres a person can enjoy. A study published in "Scientific Reports" found that listening to music that one fancies prove a definite relationship between the brain and music. Researchers from Wake Forest School of Medicine and the University of North Carolina Greensboro recruited 21 young adults and placed them in an MRI scanner as they played songs of different genres. Songs included were "Movement I from Symphony No.5" by Beethoven (classical), "Water" by Brad Paisley (country), "OMG" by Usher (rap/hip-hop), "Rock 'N Roll All Nite" by KISS (rock) and "Spring Hall" by the Chinese Jinna Opera Band (unknown genre). Researchers also asked for participants' favorite songs. The researchers played the subjects’ favorite songs and scanned their brains using an MRI to see how a person's feelings about that song influenced his or her brain activity. When the research subjects listened to their favorite song, the MRI showed that they were better connected and focused on what is being done at the moment. One would think listening to music that satisfies them makes them pay more attention to the song than what it being done, but that's not the case.

The Brain and Music responding to each other.
"Music is interesting, and if you're engaged with something interesting, it's hard to stay bored. You have more fun and are more likely to get the task done faster and better."

That pleasurable response that the brain emits when listening to favorable music is actually beneficial for many people! A study in 2005 published by Teresa Lesiuk of the University of Windsor, Canada, showed that listening to music helped to improve enthusiasm and as well as their efficiency in completing a task. Much of this has to do with the release of a chemical called dopamine, which is emitted when one listens to music; in turn, this makes them happier than they might be when they are not listening to music. That happiness actually heightens enthusiasm going about work and makes it not boring or tedious. When one is bored, one is not-so-productive. But, by listening to music, we become less bored or not bored at all, thus, increasing our productivity. When there’s music playing in the background, the mind has something to keep it occupied aside from what is being focused on work-wise. This helps reduce boredom and increase one's ability to take on whatever the task may be. Music is interesting, and if you're engaged with something interesting, it's hard to stay bored. You have more fun and are more likely to get the task done faster and better.

Music & Fun
"The brain has two attention systems: a conscious one that directs our focus towards things we want to concentrate on, such as the task, and an unconscious one that can shift attention towards anything our senses pick up."

People say that listening to music while completing a task is very distracting, and work does not get done. But that isn't true, it’s actually the opposite. Music actually increases concentration and keeps one from getting distracted from their work. But why would music help us concentrate? It has something to do with attention. The brain has two attention systems: a conscious one that directs our focus towards things we want to concentrate on, such as the task, and an unconscious one that can shift attention towards anything our senses pick up. The unconscious one is simpler, and processes emotions rather than reason. It operates faster as well. So when the brain hears or sees something that is deemed distracting, it pays attention to it longer because it is trying to discern what it is. The problem is, while our conscious attention system is focused on the task in hand, the unconscious attention system isn’t offline; it’s still functioning and very much alert - it’s scanning for anything important in the peripheral senses. And if what we’re doing is unpleasant or dull, you’re having to force the attention to stay fixed on the work and makes the unconscious attention system is even more active. Music is a very useful tool in such situations. It provides a sensual sound and pleasurable feelings to effectively occupy the unconscious attention system. Music gives the unconscious system something to focus heavily upon, letting the distractions go away and increasing the ability of the conscious system to help you get the job done.

Focused on the task at hand
"When doing a task and allowing music into the mix, it is something truly amazing."

Why do people listen to music while doing a task? It does help concentration, it does increase productivity, and it is fun. The brain and music’s relationship with each other makes you have a better connection with your task and makes it more likely for you to pay attention to what you are doing more, since music evokes a desirable response from your brain. While the pleasurable effects of music are reasonable, many people don't know the other benefits associated behind listening to music. When listening to music, it helps improve enthusiasm as well as efficiency in completing a task. Music brings happiness, and that same music brings happiness that translates to the same enthusiasm and efficiency one gets and makes the task seem more fun. People say that listening to music while carrying out a task is very distracting,but it’s actually the opposite; the truth is, music actually increases concentration and decreases becoming distracted from their work. When taking on a task or a project, music can be so valuable to anyone who is looking to get things done faster, more enthusiastically, and with more focus. When doing a task and allowing music into the mix, it is something truly amazing.

Music in my head

Credits:

Created with images by Shermeee - "Nothing personal"

Made with Adobe Slate

Make your words and images move.

Get Slate

Report Abuse

If you feel that this video content violates the Adobe Terms of Use, you may report this content by filling out this quick form.

To report a Copyright Violation, please follow Section 17 in the Terms of Use.