The Industrial Revolution By: Javan Surtan; Hour 7

There was a time, when there was no machines until the industrial revolution which has created all the things we have now.

The Industrial Revolution started when Samuel Slater came to America and made the first factory

Rapid development has been a blessing because it provided job opportunities, new technology, and improved transportation.

Power Loom

Job opportunities made the Industrial Revolution a blessing because more people started to have jobs, which lead to less poverty, and made the country richer. In the article I read it said, "The Industrial Revolution came gradually. It happened in a short span of time, however, when measured against the centuries people had worked entirely by hand. Until John Kay invented the flying shuttle for looms in 1733 and James Hargreaves the spinning jenny 31 years later, the making of yarn and the weaving of cloth had been much the same for thousands of years. By 1800 a host of new and faster processes were in use in both manufacture and transportation."

Cotton Gin

New technology was another way the industrial revolution was a blessing. In the encyclopedia Britannica School it says, "It is almost impossible to imagine what the world would be like if the effects of the Industrial Revolution were swept away. Electric lights would go out. Automobiles and airplanes would vanish. Telephones, radios, and television would disappear. Most of the abundant stocks on the shelves of department stores would be gone. The children of the poor would have little or no schooling and would work from dawn to dark on the farm or in the home. Before machines were invented, work by children as well as by adults was needed in order to provide enough food, clothing, and shelter for all.".

The Best Friend of Charleston

Transportation had a big effect to make the Industrial Revolution a blessing in Discovering Our Past: A History of The United States textbook it says, "The first railroads in the United States ran along short stretches of track that connected mines with early mines.". The railroad introduced two innovations into land transportation. One was the locomotive, which concentrated in a single unit the pulling power of many horses. The other, which made use of this increased power, was the practice of linking many separate vehicles, or cars, into trains.

Works Cited

Cotton gin. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/67182. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

She Ford Motor Company: automotive “body drop” procedure. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/122192. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Loom: power loom. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/174906. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017

“Best Friend of Charleston”: replica. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/126405. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

"Industrial Revolution." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 7 Mar. 2014. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Industrial-Revolution/275053. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

"Railroad." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/railroad/276643. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Appleby, Joyce, Alan Brinkley, Albert S. Broussard, James M. McPherson, and Donald A. Ritchie. Discovering Our Past: A History of the United States. Bothell, WA: McGraw-Hill Education, 2014. Print.

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