The curse of rapid industrial development By: halee brumbaugh 2nd hour

In the late 1700's and early 1800's the cotton industry started booming with business. The rapid increase lead to many great accomplishments and new jobs. But there were many downsides to the rapid development that made many people question whether America was becoming great or if it was hurting us in the long run. Although there are many pros, the cons are few but mighty, making it very hard to look past the awful things that went on behind the scenes of the rich white males becoming richer.

Set backs for the fast economy

Slavery was beginning to decrease on a day to day basis, that was until the cotton gin was invented and the "need" for slavery began again. Although the cotton gin was essential for our growing economy, the slaves behind the machine set America back another 20 years. This was a curse because of all the innocent people who were tortured because of a skin color they had no say on. With out this invention America might have been with out slaves for at least 10 more years than what it is now. This invention was great except it increased slavery which counter acted the anti slavery movement. "Because the labor requirements on plantations were great, blacks were imported from Africa and the West Indies to work the fields. Thus the cornerstones of Southern culture and land use—an agricultural base, a white population that stemmed largely from the British Isles and was overwhelmingly Protestant, the plantation system, and a black population that served as slaves—were set early."

Slaves using a cotton gin, a new machine to make the process of picking seeds out of cotton faster.

Slavery

Besides slave children, many free children began working jobs in factories. The factories were very dangerous even for adults let alone children. The children got little to no pay for the harsh jobs they were doing. But with the growing economy most adults were already in jobs and children around 8 could start working, the mass production pressured America to move faster and faster and not care who gets hurt in the process. "This aspect of labor law originated in laws to limit the hours of work, eliminate child labor, and protect women in the work force. In today’s industrial societies the scope of such laws has broadened considerably and shifted its emphasis."

Young boy working in a factory earning money for his family.

Immigration

Since America's economy was going so fast, immigrants saw this as an opportunity to move from their homeland to America in search of a new job. American citizens weren't happy with this because they thought the immigrants were going to take their jobs. Many Americans called nativeists heavily discriminated the isrish in particular, they were treated like the aftrican slaves. Some Irish men were able to build themselves up in the economy because they were white.

Immigration overflow on Ellis island.

Works citied:

Boston: Phillips speaking against the Fugitive Slave Act. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/123226. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Child labor." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/child-labor/273637. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Child labor. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/195989. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

Child labor. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 F“Harper’s Weekly”: black slaves working the first cotton gin. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 19 Sep. 2016. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/181816. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.eb. 2017.

"Development economics." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Development-economics/311000. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

Immigration: immigrants on Ellis Island. Image. Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 3 Feb. 2017. school.eb.com/levels/middle/assembly/view/107781. Accessed 8 Mar. 2017.

"Irish Republican Army." Britannica School, Encyclopædia Britannica, 16 Mar. 2010. school.eb.com/levels/middle/article/Irish-Republican-Army/311828. Accessed 9 Mar. 2017.

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