Pre 1950 - Post 1950 Photographers Research. By Angela Kelly

Gertrude Kasebier

Facts.

  • Gertrude Kasebier was born on May 18, 1852 and died in 1934.
  • She was one of the most influential American photographers of the early 20th century.
  • She was known for her images of motherhood, her portraits of Native Americans and her promotion of photography as a career for women.
  • She attended Art School at the age of thirty seven when most women during that time were well settled in their social positions.

Gertrude's Career

  • While studying drawing and painting at Art School Gertrude became interested in photography.
  • In 1890 she decided to travel to europe in order to further her education.
  • She began spending several weeks studying the chemistry of photography in Germany.
  • A year later she spent her time in France, studying with American painter Frank DuMond.
  • Gertrude moved back to her hometown of brooklyn in 1895 to care for her ill husband when she was determined to become a professional photographer.
  • She first started her career when she became an assistant to Brooklyn portrait photographer Samuel H. Lifshey, where she learned how to run a studio and expand her knowledge of printing techniques.
  • A year later she produced an exhibit with 150 photos which lead to her success and attending lectures to encourage more women to get into photography.
  • A quote by Gertrude Kasebier; "I earnestly advise women of artistic tastes to train for the unworked field of modern photography. It seems to be especially adapted to them, and the few who have entered it are meeting a gratifying and profitable success."

The Style of photography Kasebier produced

  • Gertrudes style of photography was based on portraits.
  • She had a sense about revealing the subject; she also she used very few props and simple backgrounds.
  • When she was in europe she had an interest in the idea of photographing as she said "a real Native American Indian, like the ones I grew up seeing."
  • She would spend time trying to learn more about the native american people who she would take photos of and give the photo more of a feel towards it.
  • She began working in the method of pictorialist movement, where she went on to practicing painting on her negatives and her use of the gum bichromate, gum-platinum, and bromoil printing techniques yielded photographs that revealed the hand of the artist and enforced the medium's expressive potential.
  • As she was exhibiting her work and getting more noticeable Gertrude Moved on to focusing on capturing photos of women to inspire others.
Here are some examples of Gertrude Kasebier's work.

Links that showcase Gertrude Kasebier's work

  • http://www.paulcava.com/gertrude-kasebier-.html
  • http://www.normandythenandnow.com/peasant-life-in-normandy-by-gertrude-kasebier-in-1894-guest-photo-blogger/

Richard Avedon

Facts.

  • Richard Avedon (born on May 15, 1923 and died on October 1, 2004) was an American fashion and portrait photographer. An obituary published in The New York Times said that "his fashion and portrait photographs helped define America's image of style, beauty and culture for the last half-century".
  • Avedon was born in New York City, to a Jewish family. His father, Jacob Israel Avedon, was a Russian-born immigrant who advanced from menial work to starting his own successful retail dress business on Fifth Avenue, called Avedon’s Fifth Avenue.
  • He would use his family’s Kodak Box Brownie not only to feed his curiosity about the world, but also to retreat from his personal life.

Richard's Career

  • In 1944, Avedon began working as an advertising photographer for a department store, but was quickly endorsed by Alexey Brodovitch, who was art director for the fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar.
  • In 1946, Avedon had set up his own studio and began providing images for magazines including Vogue and Life.
  • From 1950 he also contributed photographs to Life, Look and Graphis and in 1952 became Staff Editor and photographer for Theatre Arts Magazine.
  • Towards the end of the 1950s he became dissatisfied with daylight photography and open air locations and so turned to studio photography, using strobe lighting.

The style of photography Avedon produced

He was mostly know for his work in the fashion industry, but he also done work outside of fashion.

  • In addition to his continuing fashion work, by the 1960s Avedon was making studio portraits of civil rights workers, politicians and cultural dissidents of various stripes in an America fissured by discord and violence.[9] He branched out into photographing patients of mental hospitals, the Civil Rights Movement in 1963, protesters of the Vietnam War, and later the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • He created two well known sets of portraits of The Beatles. The first, taken in mid to late 1967, became one of the first major rock poster series, and consisted of five psychedelic portraits of the group, four heavily solarized individual color portraits and a black-and-white group portrait taken with a Rolleiflex camera and a normal Planar lens.
  • In addition to his continuing fashion work, by the 1960s Avedon was making studio portraits of civil rights workers, politicians and cultural dissidents of various stripes in an America fissured by discord and violence. He branched out into photographing patients of mental hospitals, the Civil Rights Movement in 1963, protesters of the Vietnam War, and later the fall of the Berlin Wall.
Here are examples of Richard Avedon's work.

Links that showcase Richard Avedon's work

  • https://www.avedonfoundation.org/
  • http://www.gagosian.com/artists/richard-avedon

Comparison between the chosen photographers

I chose two fashion photographers that suited my interest, given they both are from different timescales in life they are both still similar in the ways their work shows and their careers throughtout their photography journey. Gertrude's portraiture photography was more simple compared to Avedon's as he focused more on his surroundings of his model and that shows throughout his work. I like how they both have strong photographs that show emotion and tell a story through a photograph.

Created By
Angela Kelly
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