Portfolio and Student Learning Plans ZAP102 - Part 2

Skills of Effective Learners

In terms of the skills of effective learners, if you haven’t already completed the skills audits and learning styles inventory in module 3 of ZAP101, please do so. These will enable you to gauge where you are currently at with your student learning plan.

Further to this, we encourage students to complete an activity on their preferred learning style/s. A learning styles inventory in EXCEL has therefore been included as an additional learning activity that should assist with writing your plan (please see resources section in this module).

Following on from completing the self-assessments and other learning activities so far, it is anticipated that students will be able to complete an Individual Learning Plan on the template provided (also see resources section in this module), or create their own using google documents, in word or by using a format of your choice.

Following on from completing the self-assessments and other learning activities so far, it is anticipated that students will be able to complete an Individual Learning Plan on the template provided, or create their own. Please scroll down this page, or click on the following link for a template. Alternatively, you can create your own learning plan using google documents, in word or by using a format of your choice.

Continuous Reflection on Personal Goals/Learning Goals

It is important that you regularly review personal learning goals and ask yourself questions around how you decided on these. As you develop the skills to achieve these goals, you can reflect on how you did this. Then as you achieve one goal, set another, and then reflect on how you developed the skills to fulfil that goal. The key is to never stop setting goals as you progress and to never stop reflecting on goal attainment. Reflective journals or blogs within your E-Portfolio are recommended tools for this activity, however, you may opt to extend on the template provided (see above) by creating new pages, with new goals, as you progress through the course.

How you choose to engage in continuous reflection on goal attainment is up to you. It may be in the form of written monthly reflections uploaded to your E-Portfolio, or as a photographic essay with dot point reflections, or as short video clips that you upload. This type of reflective journal exercise, blogging, or video recording will help you track what you actually did over the course of the program to develop your skills. It will remind you of how you developed the capabilities that you decided you needed to work on. And why, and when, you developed them.

To compliment or extend on your personal plan, you can complete reflections about your learning journey and skills development, including the development of learner attributes – in as much or little detail as you feel is right for you. We encourage students to keep in mind that reflective practice will be assessed regularly throughout the course and hence forming habits around this will be beneficial not only for your learning but for assignments.

Continuous Reflection

It is important that you regularly review personal learning goals and ask yourself questions around how you decided on these. As you develop the skills to achieve these goals, you can reflect on how you did this. Then as you achieve one goal, set another, and then reflect on how you developed the skills to fulfil that goal. The key is to never stop setting goals as you progress and to never stop reflecting on goal attainment. Reflective journals or blogs within your E-Portfolio are recommended tools for this activity, however, you may opt to extend on the template provided (see above) by creating new pages, with new goals, as you progress through the course.

How you choose to engage in continuous reflection on goal attainment is up to you. It may be in the form of written monthly reflections uploaded to your E-Portfolio, or as a photographic essay with dot point reflections, or as short video clips that you upload. This type of reflective journal exercise, blogging, or video recording will help you track what you actually did over the course of the program to develop your skills. It will remind you of how you developed the capabilities that you decided you needed to work on. And why, and when, you developed them.

To compliment or extend on your personal plan, you can complete reflections about your learning journey and skills development, including the development of learner attributes – in as much or little detail as you feel is right for you. We encourage students to keep in mind that reflective practice will be assessed regularly throughout the course and hence forming habits around this will be beneficial not only for your learning but for assignments.

For example, a continuous reflective journal over the course of the associate degree may contain notes, or artefacts about how you developed any of the following

A continuous reflective journal may also explore any other employability skills, essential skills, graduate attributes, learner attributes and so forth (please see learning activities, including quizzes and inventories, within earlier modules – and refer back to the learner attributes above on this page e.g. confidence, commitment, independence, respect, empathy, curiosity and so forth). We recommend that you don’t stop with one page learning plans (i.e. on arrival, mid year and final year), but that you extend on these over time and use them as a ‘live document’. You may even choose to create a new page within WordPress that purely concentrates on your learning plan and reflections over the course of the associate degree, which you can discuss with your teachers or tutor, or the portfolio developer.

For ZAP102, assessment task two, you are required to complete an ‘arrival learning plan’ within the first 5 weeks of commencing the associate degree (see above template for guidance). And, future assessment tasks are currently being designed for other practice and portfolio subjects on continuing this process. Hence, the following link will take you to a video tutorial on how to upload a learning plan to your WordPress portfolio.

Uploading your student learning plan to WordPress

Module Summary

Additional support will be provided to students in terms of feedback on their student learning plans and the portfolio upload. Please don’t hesitate to contact me or ask a teacher or tutor about any concerns or for advice. The material in this module is an introduction to student learning plans/individual learning plans and how to upload to the ePortfolio. Your own creativity is encouraged at all times, as long as the material that you include meets assessment criteria – which you can discuss at any time on request, but which is also shown in the basic template above and throughout the material above.

References:

Kiley, M & Mullins, G (eds) 2004, Quality in postgraduate research: Re-imagining research education. Proceedings of the 2004

International Quality in Postgraduate Research conference, Adelaide, Australia 22-23 April.

Learning goals

Credits:

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