Policy Report ENGL 105 Writing in the Social Sciences

This unit is designed to familiarize students with the kinds of writing and ways of thinking they are likely to encounter in the social sciences. Students will be expected to analyze and synthesize two types of data, qualitative and quantitative, to produce conclusions about the phenomena under discussion. To immerse students in social scientific practices, this unit requires them to assume the role of political scientist, someone who studies political issues, processes, and systems while maintaining objectivity.

Research Proposal

Description: Identify a political issue of clear relevance to the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and its communities (students, faculty, administrators, and the surrounding town). Such issues may be local, university-wide, state-wide, or national, but in all cases they must have an immediate effect on students and be addressable by the university. For some examples, consider the issues raised in the course readings for this unit and narrow them to the university-level. Your proposal should address the issue you will study, note its implications for and relevance to the university community, and offer an initial hypothesis about how the issue could be remedied. It should also include a research plan that describes how you will find and collect data related to the issue. Once students have completed the first draft, they will work in class with their peers to evaluate and revise the proposal for resubmission.

Specifications: Write a 300- to 400-word proposal in double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, with 1-inch margins. The proposal must be submitted at the beginning of class on [Date]. Students must bring two copies, one for the instructor and one for peer-editing. If you are unable to attend class that day, upload it to the Sakai dropbox and turn in a hard copy the following class period. The second draft of the proposal is due [Date], following the same guidelines.

Annotated Bibliography

Description: Identify and read four scholarly sources published within the past five years that use qualitative and quantitative data to explain your topic or a closely related topic. Annotations should be a paragraph in length (120 to 150 words), and each should explain the relevance of the source to your project, consider the source's credibility, provide a summary of its argument. Once students have completed the first draft, they will work in class with their peers to evaluate and revise these annotations for resubmission.

Specifications: Produce four annotations in 12-point, Times New Roman font, with 1-inch margins. Bibliographic entries should be formatted in APSA-style and should be single-spaced; annotations should be double-spaced. The annotated bibliography is due at the beginning of class on [Date]. Students must bring two copies, one for the instructor and one for peer-editing. If you are unable to attend class that day, upload it to the Sakai dropbox and turn in a hard copy the following class period. The second draft of the annotated bibliography is due [Date], following the same guidelines.

Policy Report

Description: Write a policy report on the issue selected in your research proposal and explored in your annotated bibliography. The report should specify how the issue affects the university community and how the proposed policy recommendation is expected to alleviate those problems. Using qualitative and quantitative data from your prior research, and extrapolating from others' arguments, the report should attempt to convince the university's administration to adopt your policy proposal. The report should be a factually based argument rather than an opinion piece. Once students have completed the first draft, they will work in class with their peers to evaluate and revise the report for resubmission.

Specifications: Write a 950- to 1250-word policy report in double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman font, with 1-inch margins. Citations should follow the ASPA style guide. The report must be submitted at the beginning of class on [Date]. Students must bring two copies, one for the instructor and one for peer-editing. If you are unable to attend class that day, upload it to the Sakai dropbox and turn in a hard copy the following class period. The second draft of the policy report is due [Date], following the same guidelines.

Credits:

Created with images by Bruce Guenter - "Day 148: The end of the line" • StartupStockPhotos - "office startup business" • jaycross - "IMG_3533.JPG" • sheilaellen - "Policy"

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