Kids With Aids They matter

The American Foundation for Children with AIDS (AFCA) is a non-profit organization providing critical support to infected and affected HIV+ children and their caregivers. Since 2005, in collaboration with our in-country partners, we have served tens of thousands of families in undeserved and marginalized communities in Africa. Our areas of impact include: medical support, livelihoods, nutrition, educational support and emergency relief.

It's estimated that 37 million people are living with AIDS: approximately 1 in 200 people in the world today. More than 2.6 million children under 15 are currently living with HIV and AIDS. That's why Save the Children has prevention programs to stop the spread of AIDS and protection programs to help children who have been orphaned or are vulnerable due to the infection. In 2014, we helped 11.8 million children with HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment.

Kids are dying everyday to this horrible thing, what would do if there was a child right in front of you with aids? I would instantly take him to a hospital then what? that's what you are here to help this sad cause that is kids with aids.

Most HIV-positive children under the age of 13 are infected during pregnancy, childbirth, or breastfeeding. Better treatment and prevention strategies have helped to lower HIV infection rates for children in the United States.

Globally, between 2002 and 2013, there was a 58% reduction in the number of new HIV infections among children (under 15 years of age)

An estimated 3.2 million children around the world were living with HIV/AIDs at the end of 2013, according to the World Health Organisation.

Since the first cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were identified, the number of children infected with HIV has risen dramatically in developing countries, the result of an increased number of HIV-infected women of childbearing age in these areas. HIV is a retrovirus and can be transmitted vertically, sexually, or via contaminated blood products or IV drug abuse. Vertical HIV infection occurs before birth, during delivery, or after birth.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) weakens the body’s immune system. People with HIV are diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) when their white blood cell count falls below a certain threshold, or when they contract an AIDS indicator illness, such as Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

Students learn that we don't catch HIV from a sneeze, a water fountain, a telephone, a swimming pool, or other casual contact with an HIV-infected person. HIV is transmitted in two ways: by having sex with an infected person or by allowing infected blood to get mixed with our own.

Students learn that we don't catch HIV from a sneeze, a water fountain, a telephone, a swimming pool, or other casual contact with an HIV-infected person. HIV is transmitted in two ways: by having sex with an infected person or by allowing infected blood to get mixed with our own.

Students learn that we don't catch HIV from a sneeze, a water fountain, a telephone, a swimming pool, or other casual contact with an HIV-infected person. HIV is transmitted in two ways: by having sex with an infected person or by allowing infected blood to get mixed with our own.

If a healthy person is infected with HIV Virus, the virus makes its way to the white T Cells. The HIV virus starts destroying the T-cells. This can take some time.

Although the person with HIV virus (also called HIV positive) may feel fine, the virus is silently reproducing itself and destroying T-cells. Soon, the good T-cells can no longer battle the bad HIV cells. This means your good T-Cells (immune system) is broken down.

HIV infection isn't like a cold or the flu. Precaution actions like washing hand oftrn, covering your sneezes and the like will not protect you from getting the HIV virus. A person cannot get HIV by hugging or holding the hand of, sitting together at a place of worship, selling at the market, sharing a school bus or classroom with, or visiting the home of someone who has HIV.

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