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A Look Into Lockdown A mobile photography exhibition

A Look Into Lockdown was a 5 week mobile photography course ran as part of Reimagine Remake Replay. During the programme, participants were asked to create a small collection of photos which reflect upon their experience of the national lockdown during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This online exhibition shows the final pieces and artist statements of our participants.

The project is led by a consortium including Nerve Centre, National Museums Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Museums Council and Northern Ireland Screen, and is funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund’s Kick the Dust programme.

©Reimagine, Remake, Replay, 2021

'Quarantine’ - By MEABH MAGEE

During the progression of the current COVID-19 Pandemic, a variety of terms and phrases have become established into everyday language and vocabulary across the world. Since the Coronavirus spread has united the world in equal misfortune, these terms and phrases have become widely understood, accepted and related to by all. This photo series aims to give an insight into our situational experiences that have only been created as a result of COVID-19, with reference to the glossary of COVID terms.

'Quarantine’ - By Meabh Magee

"Through Glass" - By Jack McKee

Lockdown has brought about a lot of changes to how we live our lives. The "Stay Home" order has left many of us feeling trapped within our homes, unable to go to work, school or to see our friends. Being unable to interact as normal has seen a shift to working from home, online teaching and socialising with friends online. The use of framing and dark shadows in this photo series aims to capture the claustrophobic feeling of being stuck at home and the primary light source being from a screen represents how our work and social lives are being lived through screens

"Through Glass" - By Jack McKee

"Fever Dream" - By David Quinn

Lockdown for me has been a mix of emotions, tasks, and a huge struggle. I titled my collection in a way that I felt about how the whole of experience had been for me, with being separated from family, getting the virus and struggling with the after-effects, and then losing those close to me. Covid-19 has had huge impacts on individuals.s and the world and I wanted this collage of images to capture my feelings as a time to reflect on.

The meaning behind each photo is, however, you want to interpret it, for me personally each photo captures a stage and is focussed on a particular style of how lockdown has been for me. Some photos include how I felt about the lockdown in myself and others capture moods towards the pandemic and what it could lead.

The title holds a good point for me as it could be anything, a nightmare for some, a refresh for others, or just a sickness that will pass. It's how you look at it. And that is the beauty of art.

"Fever Dream" - By David Quinn

“Transformative” - By Jacinta Hamley

For better or worse, this year has been something. For Alfie, it has been a land in heaven. From 6 weeks in an adoption shelter to 24/7 hoomans, sweet sleeps and joy. For Honey, a new lease of life keeping up with this lively new love sponge. For us, many beautiful moments, cuddles, long walks, doggie talk gifting us social contact, excited wiggly bums from returning after DAYS* (*read 10 minutes), routine, fresh air, sun, rain, hail. Our silver lining, their magic cloud. Life in a pandemic has been a lot of things. It has brought many a challenge - internally and externally. But I thank my lucky stars for these two every day.

“Transformative” - By Jacinta Hamley

“Obstacles” - By Clare Kearney

Clare Kearney took up skateboarding over-lockdown as a form of coping with the Covid-19 pandemic. This collection captures attempts to a document a small section of the diverse identities that the skateboarding community cultivates, through the lens of her own experiences as a beginner skateboarder in Belfast.

Skateboarding is loud, unapologetic, and unconditionally creative, and the number of skateboarders has tripled over the course of the Covid-19 pandemic. For most people who live in cities during this life-changing period, it has been especially hard to find things to do when surrounded by an urban jungle. Skateboarding has been a way for locals to reclaim the civic spaces and make full use of the urban environment, and jump over, both literally and figuratively, the obstacles that Covid-19 has brought.

“Obstacles” - By Clare Kearney

"At Ease" - By Shannon Stewart

Despite being in the same house as them for over a year, I wanted to capture the more private moments of my family when they were alone. There is no posing, no plan, just me stumbling across them at their most personal.

What did they spend their free time doing?

How did they relax in the evenings?

What brings them the most ease in a world at its most chaotic?"

"At Ease" - By Shannon Stewart

"Locked Away From Loved Ones" - Shane Green

I have always labelled myself ‘anti-social’, either as a playful remark or because I’ve genuinely felt that the title fit my personality. Having said that, since this past year it has been more or less impossible to socialise in the way that we once did, I’ve found myself wishing more and more for a time where I can attend social events to return.

Don’t get me wrong; the idea of going to a party was hellish to me prior to lockdown, and I very much still hold onto that sentiment now. What I do miss though is spending time with people I love in person, and not just those who are inside of my ‘bubble’.

One of the biggest things I’ve taken away from lockdown is that I need to learn to take advantage of being able to spend time with people and get myself out there more. Though the phrase was done to death around a decade ago, it will always reign true – you only live once. Lockdown will end eventually. It’s up to us how we live our lives once it’s over.

"Locked Away From Loved Ones" - Shane Green

“Fear” - By Dani Jones

I spent the pandemic working as a student nurse and volunteering for the ambulance service. Throughout, I saw the best and worst of people, but mostly I saw fear.

“Fear” - By Dani Jones

"All The Same" - By Neve Murray

We all have different lives, experiences, livelihoods and education. However, during such a dire time, we all experince the same situation we have been put into, along with all the other issues that come with it. I wanted to look into the effects of covid on teenagers and how, while we all have very different career paths and personalities, we all face the stuggles of lockdown and isolation.

Through this series I wanted to show the contrasts of of personailies when we are in the same situation, along with creating a more vintage and dated feel to show that what we are all experiencing is like a dream and will soon be looked back on in the future"

"All The Same" - By Neve Murray

Irene de la Mora

During all these years in which I have been struggling with depression, seeing everyone else's fast-paced lives has always been incredibly overwhelming for me.

I would see how the people around me were moving on at a frenetic rhythm I just don't have the capacity to follow, while I have been stuck in the same position for a very long time. Lockdown meant that, for once, everyone was walking at my pace.

Irene de la Mora

"Life Moves On" - By Jodi Morrison

It was interesting at the beginning of lockdown and all the way throughout to see so many people determined to cling on to their own version of what normal should be. In this series of photos I wanted to show both personal experiences from my family and I , but also the various stages that multiple people went through to try and accept our reality; our new normal.

In this collection of photos I also wanted to capture what it was like to be a part of a vulnerable family during the pandemic which is the reason that all the photos in this series are taken from either behind a window or outside in a remote, isolated location.

Furthermore, many people including myself felt that they lost themselves during the pandemic and in a way, every single person in our society was affected in this shared experience, so the pages in the photographs represent the only way I myself was able to make sense of my situation, through writing.

"Life Moves On" - By Jodi Morrison

"Home away from home!" - By Yasmin Ayyad

Having to leave home in such a strange time was difficult and leaving the nest and a nice weather to come to rainy and cloudy Belfast was a challenge to say the least but thankfully I was lucky enough to meet new people who made being stuck inside bearable and fun, helped me get over my homesickness by creating new memories and friendships that would last a lifetime, therefore I will forever be grateful for these humans in the pictures who became my Belfast family, my small bubble who I will always remember for getting locked in together in a new house, a new city and even a new country! And managed to stay alive and sane without killing each other even when we reached the point of driving each other crazy and now we can’t wait for everything to open up so we can have a little break from each other!

"Home away from home!" - By Yasmin Ayyad

“The Ageing of Axl” - By Natalie Cole

During the beginning stages of the pandemic Axl suffered health wise. First he had cancer and then his heart murmur worsened. In past days he enjoyed long walks and the company of his humans. This series of photographs depicts Axl's experience during the course of Lockdown, the stages of his recovery, and how he has adapted to the necessary changes in his lifestyle as well as found a new contentedness in being surrounded by family 24/7.

Side note: I think the last two images should maybe be swapped round. I was trying to go from more of a desaturated tired state back into more alert and happy

“The Ageing of Axl” - By Natalie Cole

Alysia Rea

Lockdown for me and many others classed as vulnerable was quite a worrying and isolating time. For most of my life, I've been battling a rare disorder called Diamond Blackfan. I've found it especially hard during the lockdown as I am no longer allowed to bring anyone to appointments, this has caused me enormous anxiety as I also have hearing loss so I find it extremely difficult to even hear what doctors are saying with masks on. This as you can imagine has made life quite difficult and caused me some distress. It's been harder than ever to access the treatments that I need and I'm not the only one affected by this. It is so awful to see such vulnerable people facing such a hard time with no one by their side. The nurses do all they can but they are busy. My series of Images aims to showcase the loneliness a lot of us have felt during this time and how everything seems so much more daunting than before. However there is still light at the end of the tunnel, we still have hope.

Alysia Rea

“Slumber” - By Jessica Underwood

With the sudden emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic, Northern Ireland and life as we knew it was transformed into a state of dormancy and hibernation, celebrated places once full of life now absent and stationary. Jessica Underwood aimed to capture these dormant places in her rural county town of Omagh, looking to the spaces which have went into a state of slumber, a contrast to their once typical lively past. The emptiness and absence of these spaces also showcases the interactions and connections lost to the pandemic. Places filled with memories and connections now left to rest- a constant reminder of the extent in which people- friends, family- have lost contact with one another throughout the last year. And a reminder of the communities these places once served and nurtured, now drifted apart. The question remains if, and how, these places and their influence will ever return to what they used to be.

“Slumber” - By Jessica Underwood

"Fan Sa Bhaile" - By Rebecca Lynas

For many people lockdown was a time of distresss; broken routines, loneliness and loss. For others it was a time of transformation; learning to love yourself, making new hobbies and growth. Regardless of how you experienced it, we should be thankful to our bodies for carrying us through a global pandemic. In these photos I captured the people I spent the most time with over lockdown, my sister, my best friend and myself.

"Fan Sa Bhaile" - By Rebecca Lynas

"There for me" - By Amber Lively

Lockdown was a very isolating and lonely time, but my pets are always there to keep me company. I got to spend a lot more time with Kaspar and Missy. Missy (the dog) is now 13 years old, so it was lovely to be in her company during her elderly years. Kaspar (the cat) is a really great companion, she never fails to cheer me up when things got hard.

"There for me" - By Amber Lively

“Doggy Daunders” - Hephzibah Wilson

“For many people dog walking has become a welcome breath of fresh air during lockdown; a chance to forget about the pandemic, and the various related stresses that come with living in such a time. However, during recent months I have noticed that even on walks, Covid related rubbish has begun to encroach on what should be a period of tranquillity with our fluffy four-footed friends. This collection of photos focuses on the various items of rubbish I found in my local area whilst taking my lovely pooch, Pepper for her daily daunder. I hope that this collection will raise some awareness for our growing problem with Covid related waste and will hopefully encourage all of us to take responsibility for our environment - and maybe even pick up some rubbish!"

“Doggy Daunders” - Hephzibah Wilson

"Stuck While Moving" - By Shane Green

2021 began with me feeling like I was finally getting things in order – I had caught sight of what career path I wanted to pursue, I was finally living independently like I’d always wanted to, it looked like the end of lockdown was finally in sight. I even got accepted onto every course I had applied for! I felt like I was clearing every hurdle that I had once been unable to…

So, when several more unforeseen obstacles presented themselves, seemingly one coming right after another, the overwhelming anxiety that came with them overtook me and, even now, I find myself struggling on a daily basis to see the light at the end of the tunnel that I’ve always reassured myself is there somewhere.

Regardless, I will carry on with the same mindset that I have always had: There will always be light at the end of the tunnel. Some tunnels are just longer than others.

"Stuck While Moving" - By Shane Green