Morse Code By Alice

What is morse code?

Morse code is a way of transmitting information as a series of on-off tones, lights, or clicks. Beginning in 1836, the American artist Samuel F. B. Morse, the American physicist Joseph Henry, and Alfred Vail developed an electrical telegraph system. This system sent pulses of electric current along wires which controlled an electromagnet that was located at the receiving end of the telegraph system. A code was needed to transmit natural language using only these pulses, and the silence between them.

Who Invented morse code?

Samuel Finley Breese Morse (April 27, 1791 – April 2, 1872) was an American painter and inventor. After having established his reputation as a portrait painter, in his middle age Morse contributed to the invention of a single-wire telegraph system based on European telegraphs. He was a co-developer of the Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy. Morse code is named after Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph.

Why was Morse code invented?

Morse code was critical for communication during World War II. It was also used as an international standard for communication at sea until 1999, when it was replaced by the Global Maritime Distress Safety System. The new system takes advantage of advances in technology, such as satellite communication.

When was morse code used and is it still used now?

Today, Morse code remains popular with amateur radio operators around the world. It is also commonly used for emergency signals. It can be sent in a variety of ways with improvised devices that can be switched easily on and off, such as flashlights.

Here is a short example of morse code.

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