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2018 Youth Leadership Experience Special Olympics UTAH

The Unified Generation is paving the way for equality and respect for those with intellectual disabilities through their leadership and commitment to inclusion.

Coordinated alongside the 2018 USA Games in Seattle, 37 delegations representing their State Special Olympics Program convened for the inaugural Youth Leadership Experience. These delegations embodied inter-generational leadership through the collaboration between the Unified pair and their adult mentor. A variety of training opportunities and activities empowered youth leaders to return to their local schools and communities as agents of change.

Team Utah

Natalie Green, Kate Hut & Judy Hut

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Young Athletes Festival Volunteer

The Young Athletes Festival provided a unique opportunity for the YLE participants to take on a Games volunteer role. At the event, YLE participants interacted with children and families in the community and honed their skills in spreading the message about Young Athletes. Over the course of a three-day period, almost 300 children with and without intellectual disabilities came to the YA Festival to participate in a variety of activities – including activity stations, a photo booth, an obstacle course and a Strider Bike adventure zone.

During the Festival, YLE teams co-led two of the six available volunteer roles. Some roles, such as the individual activity stations and obstacle course, allowed participants to learn more about gross motor skill development and supporting children of all abilities in accomplishing tasks by modifying or enhancing activities. Other roles, such as registration and participant guides, let participants develop their interpersonal skills by interacting with families, answering questions about Young Athletes and directing families to more information about continuing their involvement locally.

For many of the participants, the opportunity to interact with the future of the Special Olympics movement was powerful and provided an opportunity to influence the next generation. The reflections highlighted the importance of having Young Athletes and youth leaders work together. Many stories focused on how important it was for the Young Athletes and their families to see youth leaders of all abilities leading this event. The YLE participants were a wonderful example of how everyone is a leader!

Interscholastic & Intercollegiate Evaluation

Through the observation of Interscholastic Unified Basketball and Intercollegiate Unified Flag Football, youth leaders were motivated to continue their involvement with Special Olympics as they make the transition from high school to college.

Interscholastic Basketball and Intercollegiate Flag Football

Youth leaders learned how to identify the important elements of Unified Sports – meaningful involvement and player dominance during competition. Representatives from the National Intramural and Recreation Sports Association (NIRSA) met with YLE participants to discuss their partnership with Special Olympics and shared insight on connecting with recreation professionals on college campuses. NIRSA is the leading organization for college recreation, which makes their partnership critical for the continued expansion of intercollegiate Unified Sports.

Evaluating a Unified BB game and youth leaders debriefing with NIRSA

To conclude the day, we had youth leaders break up into small groups and develop their own sales pitch for Unified Sports. Students approached each pitch differently, combining personal experiences and facts about Unified Sports, which resulted in both entertaining and effective pitches.

Social Media & Storytelling Reporters

With the Social Media and Storytelling rotation at the Youth Leadership Experience, participants were invited to immerse themselves into one of the foundations of the Special Olympics movement: sharing stories of inclusion.

With the YLE’s unique structure of having the participants recognized as part of the delegation, they were able to form connections with fellow athletes and partners representing their state. As on-site reporters, the Unified pairs utilized social media to send out updates and stories to their followers about their delegation’s athletes. Activating all the youth pairs as reporters produced a vast amount of content for Special Olympics social channels.

The freedom to explore all the Games had to offer also gave pairs the unique opportunity to complete an “audio/video scavenger hunt.” The YLE pairs spent half of their day in this rotation interviewing spectators, family members, volunteers, and athletes, stepping out of their comfort zone as observers and into the role of active interviewers. This gave them new perspective, speaking with people of a variety of ages, abilities, and reasons for attending the Games.

Throughout the week, the youth pairs have gained more confidence to be leaders of inclusion in their communities at home. They swapped stories, shared ideas, and built relationships that have given them a renewed passion for Special Olympics. By forging these new friendships and gaining new perspectives on inclusion, each youth leader now has a unique experience to fuel their Special Olympics journey moving forward.

Volunteer Shadow Experience

Each Unified pair gained job training and experience during their volunteer shadow rotation. On this day, youth leaders were assigned to hosts ranging from Special Olympics staff, sport coaches, media and fundraising partners, Technical Delegates, Healthy Athletes practitioners and more! Youth leaders and mentors were able to observe and develop new skills in their areas of interest or within potential career paths.

With this rotation, youth leaders and adults were able to develop new relationships within our growing network and not only gain perspective on role responsibilities, but also provide new perspectives to our hosts. Youth leaders were able to demonstrate their readiness to take on new and meaningful roles while onsite. As our youth leaders move in to the next stage of their lives, we want to identify the connections of future careers choices and opportunities to stay involved within the movement.

Natalie, Kate and were able to experience multiple aspects of Media and Coaching by shadowing Games media volunteer, Jaymelina Esmele, and Team Utah Coach, Whitney Lott.

General Sessions

General sessions were used to prepare and to reflect on the roles our participants took on during the week, to turn an experience into action.

Opening session served as an orientation for our youth leaders and mentors. Dr. Timothy Shriver, Chairman for Special Olympics International, challenged the youth leaders to think of their “one shot” they do not want to miss over the next week, and started a little dance party to kick off the week.

Opening Session photo series: Orientation, keynote from Chairman, Dr. Timothy Shriver

Closing session served as recognition for the work they accomplished over the past four days and as an opportunity to set goals that will impact their school, their community, and their Special Olympics State Program.

Closing Session photo series: Table top discussions with SONA President & Managing Director, Marc Edenzon and SOWA Educators, Antonio & Michela

During the closing session, Unified pairs were challenged to create goals and reflect on their role as an agent of change in the Inclusion Revolution.

“With starting next month through next year we are going to start a YAC in Utah so me and Katie are going to be the leaders. We will have a bunch of activities and we will do a little bit like what we did here in Seattle.”

SO UT Goals

  • We are going to start a YAC in Utah
  • Start a Unified Soccer Team at their school
  • Work at Special Olympics in the future
  • Host more fundraisers

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