Insect orders By: maddi yother

Hymenopterans: bees, wasps, yellow jackets, hornets, and ants

Hymenoptera have two pairs of wings, the fore wings a little longer than the hind wings, and both pairs with relatively few veins. In flight, the wings can be linked together by means of hamuli. Adults can be found in a large variety of habitats.

Collectively, the Hymenoptera are most important to humans as pollinators of wild and cultivated flowering plants, as parasites of destructive insects, and as makers of honey.

Lepidoptera: butterflies and moths

Antennae present. Antennae are long and slender in female moths and generally feathery in male moths. Butterflies have clubbed antennae

Lepidoptera means "scale wing", from Greek: lepis (λεπις / genitive form λεπιδος)- "scale" + ptera (πτερα)- "wing"

Coleoptera: beetles

The name Coleoptera, derived from the Greek words "koleos" meaning sheath and "ptera" meaning wings, refers to the modified front wings which serve as protective covers for the membranous hind wings.

The Coleoptera, or beetles, includes many commonly encountered insects such as ladybird beetles (family Coccinellidae), click beetles (Elateridae), scarabs (Scarabaeidae), and fireflies (Lampyridae). They live throughout the world (except Antarctica), but are most speciose in the tropics.

Odonate: dragonfly and damselfy

In their larval stage, which can last up to two years, dragonflies are aquatic and eat just about anything—tadpoles, mosquitoes, fish, other insect larvae and even each other.

While both dragonflies and damselflies belong to the Odonata and share many common features, then are a number of noticeable differences as well. Even before hatching from the egg, differences in morphology of the egg distinguish dragonflies (Anisoptera) from damselflies (Zygoptera). Dragonfly eggs are round and about 0.5 mm long, whereas damselfly eggs are cylindrical and longer, about 1 mm long. Similarly, the nymphs (larvae) of the two groups differ. A larval damselfly abdomen is longer and narrower with three fin-like gills projecting from the end. Dragonfly nymphs are shorter and bulkier, and the gills are located inside the abdomen. The dragonfly nymph expands and contracts its abdomen to move water over its gills, and can squeeze the water out rapidly for a short burst of underwater jet propulsion.

Hemiptera: true bugs, stink bugs, shield bugs, squash bugs, milkweed bugs, ambush bugs, cinch bugs, cicadas, and aphids

This group of insects is very large, with around 75,000 species worldwide. Around 1,700 of these can be found in the British Isles. Many of them are very different from each other, but all of them have piercing mouthparts with which they can suck the juices from plants or animals - usually plants. Their mouthparts are contained in a beak (or rostrum) which is usually held underneath the body when not in use.

The species in this order are found throughout the world and they come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes, and colors. True bugs also have a mouth with a segmented beak that they use for piercing and sucking. Most true bug species feed on plant juice. All true bugs, like all insects, have segmented bodies, antennae, and six legs.

Credits:

Created with images by Lennart Tange - "Hemiptera ??"

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