Walt Whitman By: Brooke Rogers

Walt Whitman was born on May 31st, 1819. His father Walter, was a house builder while his mother Louisa Van Velsor, was a stay at home mom of nine children. Through the 1820's and the 1830's the family lived in Brooklyn and Long Island. When Walter was twelve years old he began to learn about books, and soon fell in love with reading and writing. After mainly teaching himself how to read he was hooked. He read constantly and became fascinated by specifically Homer, Dante, Shakespeare, and the Bible.

Whitman worked as a printer in New York City until a horrible fire in the printing district ruined the industry. In 1836, at the age of seventeen, he began his career as teacher in the one-room school houses of Long Island. He continued to teach until 1841, when he turned to journalism as a full-time career.

Walter founded a weekly newspaper, the Long-Islander, and later edited a number of Brooklyn and New York papers. In 1848, Whitman left the Brooklyn Daily Eagle to become editor of the New Orleans Crescent. It was in New Orleans that he experienced firsthand the realness of slavery in the slave markets of that city. On his return to Brooklyn in the fall of 1848, he founded a “free soil” newspaper, the Brooklyn Freeman, and continued to develop the unique style of poetry that later so astonished Ralph Waldo Emerson.

"Keep your face always towards the sunshine and shadows will fall behind you." - Walt Whitman

In 1855, Whitman took out a copyright on the first edition of Leaves of Grass, which consisted of twelve untitled poems and a preface. He published the volume himself, and sent a copy to Emerson in July of 1855. Whitman released a second edition of the book in 1856, containing thirty-three poems, a letter from Emerson praising the first edition, and a long open letter by Whitman in response. During his lifetime, Whitman continued to remake the book, adding more and more poems as he went.

At the outbreak of the Civil War, Whitman vowed to live a “purged” and “cleansed” life. He worked as a freelance journalist and visited the wounded at New York City–area hospitals. He then traveled to Washington, D. C. in December 1862 to care for his brother who had been wounded in the war.

Overcome by the suffering of the many wounded in Washington, Whitman decided to stay and work in the hospitals and stayed in the city for eleven years. He took a job as a clerk for the Department of the Interior, which ended when the Secretary of the Interior, James Harlan, discovered that Whitman was the author of Leaves of Grass, which Harlan found offensive. Harlan fired the poet.

"I have learned to be with those that I like is enough." -Walt Whitman

Whitman struggled to support himself through most of his life. In Washington, he lived on a clerk’s salary and modest royalties, and spent any excess money, including gifts from friends, to buy supplies for the patients he nursed. He had also been sending money to his widowed mother and an invalid brother. From time to time writers both in the states and in England sent him “purses” of money so that he could get by. In the early 1870s, Whitman settled in Camden, New Jersey, where he had come to visit his dying mother at his brother’s house. However, after suffering a stroke, Whitman found it impossible to return to Washington. He stayed with his brother until the 1882 publication of Leaves of Grass gave Whitman enough money to buy a home in Camden.

After his death on March 26, 1892, Whitman was buried in a tomb he designed and had built on a lot in Harleigh Cemetery.

"I discover myself on the verge of a usual mistake." - Walt Whitman

Credits:

Created with images by marcelo noah - "Walt Whitman - em Camden, 1891" • dbking - "Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass""

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