Mongolia and Taiwan Isabel Zayas and Dallas Jones

Mongolia History

1919 Outer Mongolia was occupied by the Republic of China.

February 1920 Ungern drove Chinese troops out of Mongolia.

1928 Collectivization began.

1932 The failure of collectivization led to widespread uprisings

1937 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: A Stalinist terror began which would lead to the deaths of more than thirty thousand people in the Mongolian People's Republic.

1939 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: The terror ended.

1945 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: A Stalinist terror began which would lead to the deaths of more than thirty thousand people in the Mongolian People's Republic.

1961 The Mongolian People's Republic entered the United Nations.

1987 27 January Mongolia established diplomatic relations with the United States.

1992 13 January A new constitution went into effect.

1993 6 June The first direct presidential election took place. Opposition candidate Punsalmaagiin Ochirbat, a former MPRP member, won.

2003 Mongolian troops begin taking part in peace keeping operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and Sudan.

Tiawan History

1905 Earthquake in Chiayi.

1915 Tapani Incident, largest revolt in Taiwanese history; over 100 protesters killed by Japanese authorities.

1921 Petition to Establish a Taiwan Parliament" movement begins.

1935 Earthquake in Miaoli.

1941 Taiwan Revolutionary League formed to coordinate anti-Japan resistance.

1959 August 7 Flood: serious flooding in central Taiwan.

1979 The United States passes the Taiwan Relations Act, which affirms US commitment to defend Taiwan militarily and to treat Taiwan as a state for most purposes of U.S. law.

1988 President Chiang Ching-kuo dies; Lee Teng-hui assumes the presidency.

1988 President Chiang Ching-kuo dies; Lee Teng-hui assumes the presidency.

Mongolia Culture

Since ancient times Tengrism was the dominant belief system of the Mongols and still retains significant importance in their mythology.

Mongolians traditionally were afraid of misfortunes and believe in good and bad omens.

The oldest completely passed down work of Mongolian literature is probably also the most well-known abroad: The Secret History of the Mongols.

Before the 20th century, most works of the fine arts in Mongolia had a religious function, and therefore Mongolian fine arts were heavily influenced by religious texts.

. Key traditional elements are throat-singing, the Morin Khuur (horse head fiddle) and other string instruments, and several types of songs.

The Mongolian cuisine is primarily based on meat and spices, with some regional variations.

Mongolian dress has changed little since the days of the empire, because it is supremely well-adapted to the conditions of life on the steppe and the daily activities of pastoral nomads.

Popular board games are chess and checkers.

Tiawan Culture

The prevalent form of religious belief in Taiwan is a blend of Buddhism, Taoism, and Chinese folk religion, including ancestor worship

A notable Japanese influence exists due to the period when Taiwan was under Japanese rule.

The language with the most native speakers in Taiwan is Taiwanese Hokkien, or "Taiwanese" for short, spoken by about 70% of the population

Karaoke is incredibly popular in Taiwan, where it is termed KTV (karaoke television). This is an example of something the Taiwanese have drawn, on scale, from contemporary Japanese culture.

Taiwan, like its neighbors in East Asia, is well known for its buxiban (補習班), often translated as cram school, and literally meaning "make-up class" or "catch-up class" or to learn more advanced classes.

Cell phones are very popular in Taiwan

Mongolia Schooling

Mongolia has an extensive, state-financed pre-school education system. There are over 700 state and private kindergartens (name for day care). During socialist times, every sum had at least one nursery school and a kindergarten. Currently there are only kindergartens that enroll children over the age of 3.

The original system included four years of compulsory schooling followed by a further four years of compulsory lower-secondary education. There were then two years of upper-secondary non-compulsory education that either have a vocational, technical, or general education focus

As in many post-socialist countries, Mongolia's school system, previously based on the ten-year school, has been shifting towards eleven years of education.

As of 2003 there were 178 colleges and universities, though only 48 of those were public. However, there were 98,031 students at the public universities compared to 31,197 private students, indicating the continued importance of publicly funded higher education in Mongolia.

Mongolia has a high literacy rate, consistently rated around 98%.[15] This is a high figure for a country that is often rated as one of the poorest in Asia.

Tiawan Schooling

Elementary schools span grades 1 through 6, classes are held from Monday through Friday, typically from 7:30 AM through 4PM (or noon on Wednesdays). Mandarin: The official language of instruction.

Mathematics: Mathematics education begins with the basics and reaches introductory algebra and geometry by the 6th grade.

have the same classes as us.

Junior high school spans grades 7 through 9 and is the last half of compulsory education. Unlike the slower pace of elementary school, junior high students typically have a single goal in life: to score high on the national senior high school entrance exams at the end of 9th grade. Consequently, the pressure on students from teachers and parents is intense, because there will be only one test per year

There are over 100 institutions of higher education in Taiwan. Roughly 2/3 of the over 100,000 students taking the national university entrance exams are accepted to a higher educational institution.

With the intense pressure placed on students to achieve by parents, many students enroll in private after-school classes intended to supplement their regular education. These cram schools are an extremely large (and profitable) business in Taiwan and have been criticized by some as being the result of cultural overemphasis on academic achievement.

Mongolia Economy

Economic activity in Mongolia has traditionally been based on agriculture and livestock. Mongolia also has extensive mineral deposits: copper, coal, molybdenum, tin, tungsten, and gold account for a large part of industrial production.

Exports $5.272 billion (2015 est.)

Export goods: copper, apparel, livestock, animal products, cashmere, wool, hides, fluorspar, other nonferrous metals, coal, crude oil

Main export partners: China 88.9%, Canada 4.1% (2012 est.)

Imports $3.923 billion (2015 est.)

Import goods: machinery and equipment, fuel, cars, food products, industrial consumer goods, chemicals, building materials, cigarettes & tobacco, soap & detergent

Main import partners: China 37.6%, Russia 25.7%, United States 9.4%, South Korea 6.1%, Japan 4.9% (2012 est.

Tiawan Economy

Exports $318 billion (2014 est.)[4]

Export goods: Electronics, flat panels, ships, petrochemicals, machinery; metals; textiles, plastics and chemicals (2014)

Main export partners: China 27.1%, Hong Kong 13.2%, United States 10.3%

Japan 6.4%, Singapore 4.4% (2012 est.)[5]

Imports $277.5 billion (2014 est.)[6]

Import goods: Electronics, machinery, crude petroleum, computers, coal, organic chemicals, metals (2014)

Mongolia

In 1911 Outer Mongolia declared independence from the Qing dynasties.

1919 Outer Mongolia was occupied by the Republic of China.

February 1920 Ungern drove Chinese troops out of Mongolia.

1928 Collectivization began.

1932 The failure of collectivization led to widespread uprisings.

1937 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: A Stalinist terror began which would lead to the deaths of more than thirty thousand people in the Mongolian People's Republic.

1939 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: The terror ended.

1945 Stalinist purges in Mongolia: A Stalinist terror began which would lead to the deaths of more than thirty thousand people in the Mongolian People's Republic.

1987 27 January Mongolia established diplomatic relations with the United States.

1961 The Mongolian People's Republic entered the United Nations.

1992 13 January A new constitution went into effect.

1993 6 June The first direct presidential election took place. Opposition candidate Punsalmaagiin Ochirbat, a former MPRP member, won.

2003 Mongolian troops begin taking part in peace keeping operations in Afghanistan, Iraq and Sudan.

Taiwan

1905 Earthquake in Chiayi.

1915 Tapani Incident, largest revolt in Taiwanese history; over 100 protesters killed by Japanese authorities.

1921 Petition to Establish a Taiwan Parliament" movement begins.

1935 Earthquake in Miaoli.

1941 Taiwan Revolutionary League formed to coordinate anti-Japan resistance.

1959 August 7 Flood: serious flooding in central Taiwan.

1979 The United States passes the Taiwan Relations Act, which affirms US commitment to defend Taiwan militarily and to treat Taiwan as a state for most purposes of U.S. law.

1988 President Chiang Ching-kuo dies; Lee Teng-hui assumes the presidency.

1988 President Chiang Ching-kuo dies; Lee Teng-hui assumes the presidency.

Mongolia culture

Since ancient times Tengrism was the dominant belief system of the Mongols and still retains significant importance in their mythology.

Mongolians traditionally were afraid of misfortunes and believe in good and bad omens.

The oldest completely passed down work of Mongolian literature is probably also the most well-known abroad: The Secret History of the Mongols.

Before the 20th century, most works of the fine arts in Mongolia had a religious function, and therefore Mongolian fine arts were heavily influenced by religious texts.

. Key traditional elements are throat-singing, the Morin Khuur (horse head fiddle) and other string instruments, and several types of songs.

The Mongolian cuisine is primarily based on meat and spices, with some regional variations.

Mongolian dress has changed little since the days of the empire, because it is supremely well-adapted to the conditions of life on the steppe and the daily activities of pastoral nomads.

Popular board games are chess and checkers.

Taiwan culture.

Credits:

Created with images by Hapilora - "inner mongolia jingkiseukan statue" • Bernd Thaller - "Ger Camp" • Rob Oo - "Ogii Lake sunset" • The Wandering Angel - "Twilight's Prayer" • lhirlimann - "le ciel les nuages et la Terre" • Rob Oo - "Pastel Sunset" • Francisco Anzola - "Downtown Ulan Bator" • Rob Oo - "Remember to bring an umbrella"

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