Pneumonia By Megha r.

Pneumonia is an infection of the lings that can lead to be mild or severe in people of all ages. Can usually be treated without a hospital stay. Sometimes it can get really serious and can lead to death.

Causes:

Pneumonia can be caused by bacteria, viruses, and fungi. In the United States, common causes of viral pneumonia are influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Another cause of pneumonia is from being on a ventilator, this is known as ventilator-associated-pneumonia. The most common bacterial type that causes pneumonia is Streptococcus pneumoniae.

Signs & Symptoms:

There are many types of symptoms and signs to pneumonia. A pain-type of symptom would be having sharp pains in the chest. The whole body may experience fever, chills, dehydration, fatigue, loss of appetite, malaise, clammy skin, or sweating. Common signs of pneumonia include cough, fever and difficulty breathing. Some respiratory symptoms include fast breathing, shallow breathing, shortness of breath, and wheezing.

Treatment: Antibiotics can treat many forms of pneumonia. Some forms of pneumonia can be treated with the use of vaccines. There are specialists who treat pneumonia, such as; infectious disease doctor, Pulmonologist, and Primary Care Provider. Penicillin antibiotic stops the growth and kills the bacteria.

Prevention:

There are many ways you can prevent pneumonia, other than the usual washing your hands and keeping yourself clean during the seasons where pneumonia risk is high. The flu is a common cause of pneumonia, so preventing the flu is a good way to prevent pneumonia. Pneumonia can be prevented by vaccines such as:

pneumococcal

- Haemophilus- influenzae type b

- Pertussis

- Varicella (chicken pox)

- Measles

- Influenza (flu)

Pneumonia affects the lungs...

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