What Is Matter? By: Eboni adams

Matter is a physical substance in general, as distinct from mind and spirit; which occupies space and possesses rest mass.

Examples of matter;solids, liquids and gases.

There are two parts of matter; pure substance and mixture.

Pure Subtances

or chemical substance is a material that has constant composition (is homogeneous) and has consistent properties throughout the sample.

There are many examples of pure substances; tin, sulfur, diamond, water, pure sugar (sucrose), table salt (sodium chloride) and baking soda (sodium bicarbonate).

There are two parts of a pure substance, elements and compounds.

Element

An element is composed of atoms that have the same atomic number, that is, each atom has the same number of protons in its nucleus as all other atoms of that element.

Compound

a thing that is composed of two or more separate elements; a mixture.

Some examples of a mixture are; sand and water or sand and iron filings, a conglomerate rock, water and oil, a portion salad, trail mix, and concrete.

Mixture

substance made by mixing other substances together.

Homogeneous

A homogeneous mixture is a solid, liquid or gaseous mixture that has the same proportions of its components throughout a given sample.

Solutions

a liquid mixture in which the minor component (the solute) is uniformly distributed within the major component (the solvent).

Some examples of a solution are; salt and water, rubbing alcohol, and sugar dissolved in water.

Heterogenous

A heterogeneous mixture is made of different substances that remain physically separate.

Suspension

A Suspension is a heterogeneous mixture in which the solute particles do not dissolve but get suspended throughout the bulk of the medium.

Some examples of suspension are; salt water, sand in water, and muddy water.

Colloid

a homogeneous, noncrystalline substance consisting of large molecules or ultra microscopic particles of one substance dispersed through a second substance. Colloids include gels, sols, and emulsions; the particles do not settle and cannot be separated out by ordinary filtering or centrifuging like those in a suspension.

examples include whipped cream, mayonnaise, milk, butter, gelatin, jelly, muddy water, plaster, colored glass, and paper.

Credits:

Created with images by Simon Matzinger - "Living on the edge." • Little Blue Penguin - "mixture.jpg" • Bardsworld - "Bad Solution" • stevendepolo - "Whipped Cream Hot Chocolate Food Extra whipped cream"

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